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Don’t Give Up! The Secrete to Fixing a Lawnmower Pull Cord

How to Fix a Lawnmower Pull Cord

Few things are more frustrating than going to cut the grass or clear your driveway of snow and ending up with the starter cord in your hand. Eventually, it happens to everyone. When it does, check out this video on how to fix a lawnmower pull cord.

Steps for fixing a lawnmower pull cord

1) Remove the recoil

First, remove the recoil from the engine. Most are held in place with three to five bolts. After removing the recoil, remove the broken cord.

2) Measure and cut the old cord

Next, measure the old pull cord. Add about four inches to the overall length to account for the knots you need to tie on either end. Add additional length as needed if the cord broke farther from the handle.

Most of the time, however, the cord will break at the handle. In this case, you can simply reuse the existing cord. However, consider upgrading to a high-quality nylon cord for added durability.

Cut the rope to the appropriate length. Then, use a lighter to melt the ends. This seals the fibers and makes it much easier to thread the cord.

But the best seller is the ASE – Commercial 10W-30 which also qualifies as a SAE-30 weight. Available in Quarts, Gallons, cases and drums. It has all the components deleted from the automotive motor oils. No emission systems allows an oil more robust for these small sumps!

3) Tie on the handle

Remove the old lawnmower pull cord from the handle, feed through the new cord and tie a simple knot. Make sure the knot is nice and tight. Pull it back through the handle to help tighten the knot.

4) Load the recoil spring

The next thing you’re going to do is load the recoil spring. Turn the recoil in the direction that causes the engagement lugs to protrude. The engagement lugs connect the recoil to the engine and spin the flywheel.

Continue turning the recoil, making sure to apply enough pressure to prevent the spring from releasing and bloodying your knuckles.

Once you feel full tension on the spring, locate the hole on the pulley through which the starter cord threads. Align it with the outside hole on the recoil body.

5) Thread the new pull cord

With the two holes aligned, thread the new cord through about 12 inches. Make sure the cord isn’t tangled and then slowly release pressure on the recoil, letting it wind the cord for you until the handle is sitting against the recoil.

Next, tie a knot on the end of the cord. Pull the handle until the knot you just tied locks into place in the recoil pulley. Slowly let the cord retract.

6) Reattach the recoil to the engine

Finally, attach the recoil to the engine and you’re done. You just fixed your lawnmower pull cord.

What if the cord is too long?

You don’t have to go back and do everything over. Mark with a Sharpie where the cord meets the recoil. That’s where the handle should be.

Pull the cord out, keeping tension on the recoil. Make a loose knot near the recoil.

This provides slack to make a new knot where you made your mark earlier. Tie a good, tight knot and pull the cord back out, again keeping some pressure on the recoil so it doesn’t snap back. Untie the temporary knot you made earlier.

That’s how you fix a lawnmower pull cord. You’re ready to get back to cutting the lawn or blowing snow.

And for our Local customers, thank you for supporting our local store and local business!! We love Omaha our home town!

Ultimate Protection for Competition Diesel Engines

Ultimate Protection for Competition Diesel Engines

Whether competing in sled pulls, drag races or dyno challenges, competitors using DOMINATOR® 20W-50 Competition Diesel Oil enjoy the confidence and security that come with providing their diesel trucks maximum protection and performance.

Racing and high-performance diesel engines are modified to deliver maximum horsepower and torque. Their powerful designs create shearing forces that can cause oils to lose viscosity, leaving bearings, pistons and other components vulnerable to wear and failure. DOMINATOR Competition Diesel Oil delivers 50 percent more film thickness* to withstand high cylinder pressures and protect against wear. It is heavily fortified with zinc and phosphorus anti-wear additives to provide additional protection against scuffing and wear in severe conditions.

  • Competition-grade technology formulated specifically to deliver maximum power and protection in performance-modified diesel engines
  • Extra zinc and phosphorus for bulletproof wear protection
  • Fights oil breakdown under the extreme temperatures and pressures of competition, extending the lives of cylinders, rings, cranks, rods, turbochargers and bearings
  • High-viscosity formulation provides an extra level of protection, while offsetting the negative effects of fuel dilution
  • Delivers superior shear stability to withstand the intense stress and compression common to high-horsepower diesel trucks
  • May be used in any diesel engine calling for an API CK-4, CJ-4, CI-4+ or CH-4 diesel oil

 

*compared to the 3.5cP HTHS limit for SAE 15W-40

Not kept in stock at this time as it’s a niche product. Call ahead and order and we’ll have it here in 2-3 days or shipped to your door at the best price.

Engine start-stop technology – Major Wear Issues

Engine start-stop technology can increase bearing wear

Use only the best quality oil in these engines as the crankshaft needs to float. Even the “so called synthetics” don’t dampen the metal to metal issues mentioned below nearly as well as AMSOIL and you can tell due to the reduction in vibration or more consistent oil pressure as you rack up miles.

Yet another reason to upgrade to AMSOIL synthetic motor oil.

Matt Erickson | DIRECTOR, TECHNICAL PRODUCT MANAGEMENT

Nearly every technology shaping the auto industry can be traced to one goal: increased fuel economy. Engine start-stop technology is one more tool automakers have in their arsenals to ensure today’s vehicles meet tomorrow’s tightening fuel-economy regulations.

In principle, start-stop technology is simple: the engine automatically shuts off while you’re idling and restarts when you take your foot off the brake. This reduces fuel wasted while idling. Automakers introduced different startstop systems in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s; however, drivers found them awkward and unworthy of the higher vehicle price. Today’s start-stop systems are less obtrusive and are available on vehicle models from most automakers.

Should be called Metal to Metal Contact Engine

That’s not to say they’re without detractors. In fact, some automakers have installed off switches that allow motorists to disable the feature in response to negative driver feedback. But, despite their pitfalls, they’re likely not going anywhere. Consider these statistics:

  • According to bearing manufacturer MAHLE*, U.S. vehicles burned 3.9 billion gallons of gasoline while idling in 2017.
  • Buick* reports that engines with start-stop technology increase fuel economy 4-5 percent using the EPA test cycle.

Automakers leap for joy over minuscule fuel-economy gains, so you can bet they’re going to stick with anything that may provide a 4-5 percent boost.

So, what does that have to do with motor oil?

Maybe you’re aware that most engine wear occurs during cold starts. Well, engine wear occurs during warm starts, too, like every time an engine equipped with start-stop technology restarts.

We have to get technical to understand why.

The crankshaft spins thousands of times per minute in a running engine. As it spins, oil flows through tiny openings in the crankshaft journals and fills the spaces between the journals and main bearings. The crankshaft literally floats on an oil film and doesn’t contact the bearings. We call this scenario hydrodynamic lubrication. In this regime, the bearings suffer little wear and last a long time.

Run of the mill oils (95% on the shelf) are not going to provide protection with this condition

Stopping the engine, however, reduces oil film thickness. The crankshaft settles onto the bearing surfaces rather than floats over them. The oil film thickness shrinks to about the same thickness as the surface roughness of the crankshaft. This is called boundary lubrication. Starting the engine allows the microscopic peaks on the metal surfaces to contact and cause wear until the oil film has been reestablished and the crankshaft is once again floating over the bearings. This is where the oil’s additives play a huge role in protection.

Granted, only minimal wear may occur each time the engine is started. It’s not a big concern in a properly maintained traditional engine using a good oil. But what if you greatly increase engine startstop cycles?

Consider another statistic from MAHLE:

  • Start-stop cycles in equipped engines may triple over the engine’s lifetime compared to traditional engines.

That means three times more engine starts, three times more instances of boundary lubrication and three times more exposure to increased bearing wear.

Bearing wear can snowball out of control, too. Metal particles can break off and populate the oil. The bearing surface becomes rougher, encouraging adhesive wear in which peaks on metal surfaces grab and tear the mating surfaces. Eventually the crank journal and bearing can weld together, ruining the bearing.

This all points to a simple directive: make sure your customers with engines using start-stop technology are using AMSOIL synthetic motor oil to guard against bearing wear. Oil film thickness shrinks when engines start from a dead stop, placing even more importance on oil additives to maintain protection. Since engines equipped with start-stop technology spend so much more time under boundary lubrication, it’s vital to use an oil with superior film strength and additive quality. AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil delivers. It provides 75% more engine protection against horsepower loss and wear** to help protect today’s advanced engines.

This is especially needed in vehicles calling for 0W-20, 5W-20 and 0W-16.

5W-30 Viscosity Joins Synthetic Small-Engine Oil Group

For your Winter Tools – Snowblowers – New 5W30 Small Engine Oil.

Just ask for the White Cap Snowblower Oil!! 

Available Oct. 1, new Commercial Grade 5W-30 Synthetic Small-Engine Oil (AES) rounds out the synthetic small-engine oil family. It’s recommended primarily for snowblowers and generators, bringing the excellent benefits of AMSOIL Synthetic 5W-30 Small Engine Oil to applications that call for a 5W-30 viscosity oil.

Outstanding cold-flow

Cold ambient conditions and increased stress characterize snowblower operating conditions. Generators used on job sites can also run in cold weather. A 5W-30 motor oil provides improved cold-flow compared to 10W-XX motor oils. Its lower “W” viscosity means it flows more readily at startup for reliable wear protection. AMSOIL Synthetic Small-Engine Oil doesn’t contain waxes inherent to conventional oils, so it doesn’t thicken when the temperature drops, delivering superior protection and easier starts.

Commercial-grade formulation in a 5W-30

Most small-engine oils we’ve tested are nothing more than re-labeled automotive oils, which are formulated with fuel economy in mind, not durability. That won’t cut it. Compared to liquid-cooled automotive engines, small engines run hotter; operate under constant load; generate more oil-damaging contaminants; suffer from neglected maintenance; and are exposed to dirt, rain, snow and other extremes. Simply put, they’re far tougher on oil that most people think.

AMSOIL Synthetic Small Engine Oil isn’t merely a rebadged automotive oil. Instead, we designed it from the ground up specifically for small-engine dependability. You can rest assured your engines are protected even during periods of extended use when there’s no time for scheduled maintenance. It’s built to solve the problems that plague small engines, including wear, power loss, oil consumption, stuck rings and valves and harmful carbon deposits. It helps landscapers, contractors and other professionals get more work done and save money.

Reserve protection

AMSOIL 5W-30 Synthetic Small-Engine Oil is a long-life formulation that has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to safely exceed OEM drain intervals in the toughest conditions. Extensive severe-service testing proves its ability to provide service life of up to 200 hours/one year, whichever comes first. It provides an extra measure of protection when equipment goes longer between oil changes than is recommended by the OEM.

You can use any 5W-30 in any engine requiring 10W-30 and SAE-30. They are all three 30 weight oils.

Available in the Omaha AMSOIL Store on 84th St.

• Long service life
• Helps extend engine life
• Inhibits rust
• New 5W-30 primarily for
snowblowers & generator

 

ILSAC GF-6, API SP & dexos: Making Sense of New Oil Specs.

ILSAC GF-6, API SP & dexos: New Oil Specifications

As engine-operating conditions grow more severe, so do the demands placed on your motor oil. Hence the need for updated oil specifications, like ILSAC GF-6, API SP and GM dexos1 Gen 2.

New engine hardware such as turbochargers, direct injection and variable valve timing (VVT) place increased stress on your engine oil. This, in turn, has led to the introduction of more strict more oil specifications.

Here’s what we’re going to cover:

  • How strict fuel-economy standards increase engine stress
  • What is LSPI (low-speed pre-ignition)?
  • How motor oil helps prevent LSPI
  • ILSAC GF-6, API SP and GM dexos
  • Do AMSOIL synthetic motor oils meet GM dexos, ILSAC GF-6 and API SP specs?

 

Improved fuel economy

Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards require a fleet-wide average of about 40 mpg by 2026 in the United States.

To meet these requirements the automotive industry has focused on smaller, more fuel-efficient engines. In fact, most new vehicles now feature gasoline direct-injection (GDI), a turbocharger or both (T-GDI).

Severe operating conditions

Smaller, more-efficient engines that make the power and torque of higher-displacement engines undergo more severe operating conditions that can lead to…

  • Severe engine knock, also called low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI)
  • Increased engine temperatures
  • Compromised fuel injectors
  • Increased wear and deposits if the oil isn’t up to snuff

The biggest motor-oil-related challenge on the horizon is LSPI, which can destroy pistons and connecting rods.

LSPI can cause cracked pistons and rods

LSPI is the spontaneous ignition of the fuel/air mixture before spark-triggered ignition.

It is another version of pre-ignition. Pre-ignition (engine knock) has been around since the beginning of internal combustion engines.

LSPI, however, occurs under low-speed, high-torque conditions, such as taking off from a stoplight in T-GDI engines.

This scenario can create conditions where the fuel/air ignites too early in the combustion cycle, throwing off the engine’s timing.

The expanding combustion charge collides with the piston as it’s moving up the cylinder, potentially destroying the pistons or connecting rods.

Oil can help prevent LSPI

Experts suggest the cause is due in part to oil/fuel droplets or deposits in the cylinder igniting randomly. The droplets and deposits contain enough heat to ignite the air/fuel mixture before spark-triggered ignition.

Oil formulation can play a role in reducing LSPI.

Certain motor oil ingredients can promote LSPI, while others can help reduce it. It’s tempting to think, “Well, dump a bunch of ingredients into your formulations that help reduce LSPI.” But some ingredients that help reduce LSPI have been limited over the years in motor oil formulations for other reasons.

It truly is a scientific balancing act confronting oil formulators. It’s no easy task to formulate motor oils that deliver excellent wear protection, resist the increased heat of turbocharged engines, prevent deposits, act as a hydraulic fluid and, now, combat LSPI.

The performance of the entire formulation – not just one or two ingredients – is what counts.

ILSAC GF-6, API SP and GM dexos

Next-generation motor oils need to pass an LSPI test to meet these new demands.

General Motors was first out of the gate and required oils to pass its own LSPI test. Its GM dexos1 Gen 2 specification took effect Aug. 31, 2017.

The latest American Petroleum Institute (API) specification, API SP, took effect in May 2020. As did ILSAC GF-6, the latest spec from the International Lubricants Standardization and Approval Committee. For the most part, it mirrors API specifications.

ILSAC has set a new precedent in the passenger-car motor oil market by splitting its specification into two parts. One of the main differences between the two specifications is compatibility.

See the chart below. Both versions focus on wear protection, prevention of LSPI and improved engine cleanliness. However, GF-6B features a more stringent fuel economy test.

Engine oils can easily be identified as ILSAC GF-6A or 6B by the API emblem on the front label of the packaging. A shield represents the GF-6B specification, while the traditional starburst indicates a GF-6A product.

Both ILSAC specifications meet the industry-standard API SP specification which is most commonly found in owners’ manuals.

Relax…for now

For now, you don’t have to worry too much about LSPI.

Your vehicle’s computer is programmed to avoid operating conditions that lead to LSPI. But, operating your engine under those conditions does promise fuel economy gains.

AMSOIL meets the latest specs

AMSOIL synthetic motor oils meet or exceed the latest industry standards, including ILSAC GF-6, API SP and GM dexos1 Gen 2.

You can safely use our synthetic motor oils in engines that call for those specifications.

In fact, AMSOIL achieved 100 percent protection against LSPI in the engine test required by GM’s dexos1 Gen 2 specification.*

*Based on independent testing of Signature Series 5W-30, XL 5W-30 and OE 5W-30 in the LSPI engine test as required for the GM dexos1® Gen 2 specification.