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Want the Best Diesel Oils for Your Vehicle?

Confused About Diesel Oil? We’ll help you

Your diesel truck is a serious investment – don’t skimp on protection. AMSOIL manufactures the best diesel oils on the market, providing the ultimate protection for your hard-working diesel engine, preserving the horsepower you crave and keeping you on the road.

We engineer our synthetic diesel oils with the same passion and pride you put into your turbodiesel, providing protection you can depend on in the most severe operating conditions.

Do you want extra engine protection?

Excessive wear to diesel cylinder liners and rings leads to increased oil consumption and loss of compression, reducing horsepower and fuel economy.

AMSOIL delivers rock-solid wear protection you can rely on.

Do you tow or haul?

Operating at up to 150,000 rpm in temperatures that exceed 1,000°F (538ºC), a turbocharger on a stock engine can dish out a lot of punishment to your oil.

If it’s not formulated to take the beating, the oil can break down, creating deposits and wear.

For some, stock engines don’t provide enough power, but dropping a tune on your engine puts even more stress on both your turbo and your oil.

Here again, AMSOIL delivers.

When you push the Turbo in your diesel, we'll provide the extra protection.

Do you store your vehicles and equipment?

Intermittent use, prolonged storage, humidity and short drives can lead to the development of rust and corrosion, causing major damage to diesel engines.

Come of the better known diesel oils offer little rust protection if any.

Do you drive in hot temperatures?

AMSOIL synthetic diesel oils resist thermal (heat) breakdown better than conventional and competing synthetic diesel oils, effectively retaining their protective viscosities for added engine protection in extreme temperature conditions.

Check out the entire AMSOIL diesel Oil line

Do you drive in cold temperatures?

Unlike conventional oils, AMSOIL synthetic diesel oils contain no wax, staying fluid in sub-zero temperatures for easier starting, improved oil flow and reduced wear.

Signature Series 0W-40 has a broad viscosity range that offers 4X better cold-cranking ability than a 15W-40. Use the 0W-40 year round here in Sioux Falls  – no problem!

Find out how to keep diesel fuel from gelling in the cold.

Do you own a high-mileage vehicle?

AMSOIL synthetic diesel oils provide low rates of volatility (burn-off), reducing oil consumption during operation and passing less oil vapor into the combustion chamber.For example the Signature Series in 2017 and earlier Duramax engines per customer feedback yield a significant reduction in regens! The savings in fuel and agony is worth that alone.

Reduced oil consumption is especially important for the performance of your exhaust system.

lower oil consumption saves you in future diesel downtime and loss of fuel economy.
A top seller in the Sioux Falls 98th St Store.

 

How do we define “severe service”?

How do we define “severe service”?

When pushing our lubricants to their limits, we sometimes find the limits of the test equipment first.

Matt Erickson | TECHNICAL MANAGER – PCLT PRODUCTS AND MECHANICAL R&D

One of my responsibilities here at AMSOIL is to help develop tests in our mechanical lab designed to push lubricants to their limits, both ours and those of our competitors. An effective performance test accelerates lubricant degradation and forces the oil to its breaking point sooner than if tested in the field. This provides more data, faster.

The definition of “severe”

Given the severity of our testing, what happens when the equipment we test fails before our lubricants? Honestly, it causes us to simultaneously rejoice and curse. On one hand, we know our products withstand the toughest conditions we throw at them. On the other, we have to contend with the extra cost and hassle of test equipment that just isn’t built to handle the punishing conditions.

The August 2016 Tech Talk revealed how some two- and four-stroke equipment we’ve tested couldn’t stand up to our test conditions. We’ve run into the same predicament in the passenger car/light-truck market, too.

One recent incident involved the popular General Motors* 3.8L motor. Historically, the GM 3.8L is a rocksolid engine that’s powered millions of cars over the years. It’s a fixture in industry performance testing. One standardized test uses this engine under severe conditions for 100 hours. But our oils soldier through that test like a walk in the park, so we have to triple its length to 300 hours to get useful data. Not an easy task for equipment not designed to handle such extremes.

Well, we recently blew up a GM 3.8L engine. The image shows some of the carnage we found after removing the oil pan. All those bits and pieces used to be a piston.

We ran this test under extreme conditions, as if you were towing continuously at highway speeds uphill for weeks.

Unleaded gasoline

What happened, you ask? First, I’ll ease any concerns you might have: it wasn’t the oil’s fault. We were in uncharted territory, never having an oil last so long in this test before, so we knew we were on borrowed time. In fact, after more than four weeks of testing, the oil hadn’t even reached its breaking point. One of the exhaust valves broke off and fell into the cylinder, where it and the piston were pulverized into the mess you see here. As the piston and valve debris made its way to the oil pan, the crankshaft caught it and blew a hole in the side of the engine block. The severity of our test conditions combined with valve seat recession are to blame.

Years ago, lead was added to gasoline to, among other functions, lubricate the valve seats. Once lead was officially banned from gasoline, in 1996, the fuel no longer provided the same level of valve-seat protection. This lack of protection, combined with the extreme conditions of our test, invited valve recession. When valve seats recede, the valve no longer seats evenly. The result is a loss of heat-transfer that overheats and erodes the valve, as well as an uneven side load that causes the valve to bend slightly on every cycle. This onetwo punch eventually caused the valve to fail. We ran this test under extreme conditions, as if you were towing continuously at highway speeds uphill for weeks. Oil temperatures exceeded 300ºF. The extreme, 1,500ºF exhaust gas temperatures, combined with the constant stress of unevenly eroded valve seats, eventually led to valve failure, snapping a valve in half and destroying the engine.

But our oils soldier through that test like a walk in the park, so we have to triple its length to 300 hours to get useful data. Not an easy task for equipment not designed to handle such extremes.

Suitable for continued use

The good news, however, is the motor oil was still good. Even after hundreds of hours of operation so severe it destroyed the engine, the oil analysis still looked great. It made me smile to see our oil last that long, but it also made me cringe because we were going to have to once again re-test to try to get the oil to break.

This conundrum might present challenges to us engineers, but it amounts to you and your customers receiving the best synthetic lubricants available. We’re happy to keep blowing up engines in our mechanical lab to ensure your engines are protected out in the field.

Given the severe nature of our performance tests, the test equipment sometimes fails before our lubricants.