Skip to main content
Product Catalog

Download the Latest Full Color AMSOIL Catalog

Vehicle Look-Up Guides

Match AMSOIL to your Equipment

Wholesale Buying Options

Local or Out of State - The Choice Is Yours!

Weaver Customs: Dedicated Restomod Builders

WEAVER CUSTOMS: DEDICATED BUILDERS

Award-winning car builders Randy and Sydney Weaver put in the long hours required to take projects from ordinary to extraordinary. Their hard work has paid off.

Founders of Weaver Customs in West Jordan, Utah, Randy and Sydney Weaver are pushing the envelope of the custom industry and reaping the rewards. One recent build, a 1953 custom Bel-Air* called “Vortex,” has already earned six “Best of Show” awards. “It’s won us a lot of money, and we had a lot of fun with it so far,” said Sydney.

 

Horsepower

The couple expanded on their early endeavors and the shared interest that set them on a collision course. “I grew up originally on a farm or ranch, so I was basically a cowboy my whole life until I took up hot rodding,” said Randy. “And I kind of mixed hot rodding with the horses and the cowboy life and all that as well.”

“We actually met at a horse show,” said Sydney. “I got pretty heavily in the horse industry and started showing horses as a kid, and I hauled coast to coast showing. The horse industry and the car industry are very parallel.”

“Work ethic is the same,” said Randy. “It is a spitting image to have that work ethic to make this car, to work on that ranch and take care of those animals and all the stuff that comes with it. So, yes; very, very similar.”

Commitment Comes Standard $

In the middle of a build, 18 to 20-hour days are common. “This isn’t a hobby that you can pick up and put down,” said Sydney. “We’re here at 4 o’clock in the morning. We’re here at 6 o’clock in the morning. We’re here at any given time of the day, any day of the week that we’re back in town not on the road with shows. It pretty much comes down to whenever we’re done.”

guy and chick who work on old cars - Weaver family

The Big Reveal

AMSOIL has been documenting the couple’s latest build, set to be unveiled in our booth at the upcoming SEMA Show in Las Vegas. Join us as the show kicks off Nov. 5 and check out the final product. Follow the Weavers’ progress anytime at amsoil.com/weaver.

International Travelall sick

 

This isn’t a hobby that you can pick up and put down. You truly have to live the life. – Sydney Weaver

Weaver Customs

Passion At Work

The accolades continue to roll in as the Weavers set their sights on the next project. “One of the things that sets Weaver Customs apart from the rest of the industry is the sheer passion that we have behind our builds,” said Sydney. “Not only just the talent and the time, but the level of creative craftsmanship and dedication that we have behind each build really sets them apart.”

“People say you’d better slow down,” said Randy. “You’re going to get burned out. And at 41 years old, I guess I’m still here and I’m not burned out. I still love my job.”

– Randy Weaver

Weaver Customs

Hey, don't laugh. It's getting fixed.

Oil Analysis Kits – They’re Easy

How to Perform Oil Analysis

We keep these kits right here in the Omaha store. Ask for the one with postage or with out for a slight savings. When doing several vehicles use the one w/o postage to send all together.

Used oil analysis is one of the most potent tools in your vehicle-maintenance arsenal. It effectively provides a glimpse inside your engine to gauge lubricant and component condition without so much as removing a bolt or bloodying a knuckle. And it’s simple and inexpensive. Here’s how to perform oil analysis.

What is oil analysis?

First, let’s define our terms.

Oil analysis is the process of chemically analyzing a lubricant sample (typically used motor oil) to determine lubricant and engine or component condition.

You take a sample of the lubricant and ship it to a qualified laboratory. Technicians subject the lubricant to a range of tests to determine the concentration of wear metals, fuel dilution, the lubricant’s total base number (TBN), oxidation and other information. The lab sends you a report that shows lubricant condition and includes a brief explanation and recommendations for future service.

The benefits of oil analysis

Determining the condition of the oil inside your engine offers a number of benefits, all of which save you time, money and hassle in the future.

Maximize oil drain intervals

Monitoring the condition of the oil allows you to optimize drain intervals so you can capitalize on the fluid’s full service life. Performing fewer oil changes minimizes maintenance costs and, for businesses that depend on vehicle availability, maximizes uptime. It also vastly reduces the amount of waste oil you have to truck to the recycling facility, helping the environment.

Extend equipment life

Monitoring system cleanliness and filtration efficiency can help you keep your vehicles and equipment longer and significantly reduce replacement costs.

Prevent major problems

Oil analysis identifies dirt, wear particles, fuel dilution, coolant and other contaminants that can cause catastrophic failure or significantly shorten equipment life. Arming yourself with this information allows you to proactively fix problems before they spiral out of control.

Maximize asset reliability

For businesses that maintain vehicle fleets, testing and analysis ensure that equipment is up, running and making money instead of laid up in the shop.

Increased resale value

Performing oil analysis provides valuable sampling history documentation that can justify higher equipment resale values.

How to perform oil analysis

To demonstrate how easy it is to perform oil analysis, I obtained an oil analysis kit from Oil Analyzers INC. and identified the perfect subject from my family fleet – my trusty 1998 Toyota Corolla. I thumped down exactly $2,995 for the car more than three years ago, and it’s been bulletproof ever since. In fact, it was used in this demonstration of how to test engine compression. Check it out to see how it performed.

Here’s what you’ll need to perform oil analysis on your vehicle

1) Warm up the engine

Warm oil flows more easily through the sampling pump. In addition, circulating the oil prior to drawing a sample ensures consistency. Just run the vehicle for a couple minutes; there’s no need to bring it up to operating temperature.

2) Draw the oil sample

Using a vacuum pump is the easiest and cleanest way to accomplish this. It allows access to the oil sump through the dipstick tube. Thread a clean sample bottle to the pump. Attach a length of clean hose to the top of the pump and tighten the lock ring.

PRO TIP: To know how much sampling hose to use, measure the dipstick and add a foot.

Insert the opposite end of the tube into the dipstick tube. It helps to cut it at a 45-degree angle to avoid snagging on bends or restrictions.

Once it bottoms out in the oil sump, retract the tube about an inch so it’s not pulling contaminants off the bottom of the oil pan. Pump the plunger until the bottle is 3/4 full.

Sometimes it’s impossible to draw a lubricant sample through the dipstick tube. In these cases, you can pull the sample straight from the reservoir, although it’s messier. If this is the case, allow the lubricant to drain for a couple seconds before catching a sample in the bottle so contaminants that have settled around the drain plug are flushed out. Quickly reinstall the drain plug and top-off the reservoir.

3) Ship the oil sample

Most oil analysis kits come with the appropriate labels and directions for shipping it to a lab. Follow the instructions, then hang tight until the results arrive.

4) Read the results

I can’t speak for all oil analysis labs, but Oil Analyzers INC. typically returns results in about two days after receiving the sample. I received a PDF in my inbox the day after the lab had received the oil sample.

Shop Oil Analysis Kits

The lab sends a report that includes application information, elemental analysis and recommendations. The amount of information varies depending on the kit you use.

Let’s take a look at the report for my ’98 Corolla.

oil analysis sheet

It’s important to note that I put 10,915 miles on the oil over the course of 11 months. First, notice the severity status level in the upper right. It provides a quick reference to determine the status of the sample.

  • Severity 0 (Normal) = Oil is suitable for continued use.
  • Severity 1 (Normal) = Oil is suitable for continued use. Observe for trends in future tests.
  • Severity 2 (Abnormal) = Oil is suitable for continued use. Resample at half the normal interval.
  • Severity 3 (Abnormal) = Replace oil filter and top-off system with fresh oil. Resample at half the normal interval or change oil.
  • Severity 4 (Critical) = Change oil and filter if not done when sample was taken.

My sample fell into the Severity 2 category. Why?

Notice the Multi-Source Metals and Additive Metals highlighted in yellow.

The information in the Comments section explains why: “Flagged additive levels are lower than expected for the identified lubricant. This may have been topped off with a different lubricant, the fluid may be misidentified, or a different lubricant or formulation may have been in use prior to a recent change.”

Nailed it.

I’m guilty of having topped-off the engine with a different AMSOIL product than the Signature Series 0W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil initially used for the oil change 11 months earlier. This report shows why you shouldn’t mix lubricants, if possible. Sure, it won’t do lasting harm to the engine, but mixing lubricants disrupts the oil’s chemistry and can shorten its service life and reduce performance.

Learn from my negligence, friends – don’t mix engine oils.

Reading an oil analysis report

You can also see fuel dilution is moderately high while TBN is moderately low. As Allen Bender, Oil Analyzers INC. Manager told me, the TBN is no cause for concern and there is “considerable time” before the oil would have to be changed.

All in all, this is a good report for a 21-year-old engine with more than 150,000 miles, most of it using who-knows-what motor oil.

Wear metals are low, meaning the oil is doing a great job protecting the bearings and other components from wear. Contaminants are also low, meaning the air filter is capturing silicon and other debris before it reaches the engine. The report shows no glycol contamination, which means the engine coolant is where it’s supposed to be – in the cooling system – and not in the oil via a leaking head gasket or other issue. And oil viscosity and oxidation are both good, showing that the oil is holding up fine, even after 11 months.

The one area that provides a little concern is 3-percent fuel dilution. As noted, this is a moderate level and shouldn’t cause alarm, but it is something to watch.

This is a perfect example of the power of oil analysis. It allows me to monitor the fuel-dilution level and potentially take action if it increases to a problematic level. Knowing the engine suffers moderate fuel dilution also reinforces the importance of using a high-quality synthetic oil (and not mixing oils!) to ensure maximum protection.

Give oil analysis a try. It’s relatively cheap for the information it provides and it empowers you to take better care of your vehicles while maximizing their return on your investment.

Shop Oil Analysis Kits

We have all the main oil analysis kits here in the Sioux Falls store. 47073 98th st. Just behind Marlins found at Exit 73 on I-29.

605-274-2580

 

OE 0W-16: Light and Strong

OE 0W-16: Light and Strong

Now in stock in Sioux Falls. Exit 73 behind Marlins!

A 0W-16 viscosity motor oil may seem exotic to North American drivers, but as fuel efficiency requirements increase, it may become a common recommendation of manufacturers worldwide. Japanese engineers have long experimented with ultra-thin motor oils, and 0W-16 has been in regular use in Japan since the 90s.

The Benefits of Going Thin

Lower viscosity motor oil can increase fuel economy, and the pressure to create engines that sip less fuel has hastened the introduction of these viscosities to North America. The stated fuel mileage estimates for several 2018 vehicles were calculated with 0W-16 motor oil installed. Beyond fuel economy, lower viscosity oil can also provide excellent cold-starts in the most frigid temperatures.

See the latest updates via this product spec sheet covering the OE line. This link is automatically updated any time there is a change in data.

OE 0W-16 Synthetic Motor Oil

The primary concern with low viscosity oil is wear protection. Like the rest of the OE line, OE 0W-16 develops a strong fluid film that keeps metal components separated and protected. Our work didn’t end with simply blending a new viscosity. OE 0W-16 Synthetic Motor Oil (OES) is formulated with unique anti-wear additives that protect critical engine parts like pistons and cams. This added protection is particularly important in the extreme environments produced by today’s smaller-displacement engines that run on lower viscosity oil.

  • Provides advanced wear protection
  • Improves fuel economy & maintains low emissions
  • Protects pistons from low-speed pre-ignition
  • Keeps engines clean
  • Protects in all temperatures
  • Meets the requirements of popular new vehicles like the 2018 Toyota* Camry* and the 2018 Honda* Fit*
  • Recommended for use in applications that require the API SN PLUS (Resource Conserving) specification. Use only where 0W-16 is specified. Do not substitute for 0W-20 or other viscosity.

 

How Does a Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) Work?

The Function of a Dual-Clutch Transmission

Market Technology before it’s ready!

A dual-clutch transmission (DCT) is synonymous with high performance. Compared to a traditional automatic transmission, it delivers…

  • Faster, smoother shifts
  • Increased fuel economy
  • Improved performance
  • Surprise breakdowns (well they’ll solve that soon)

Although the DCT transmission dates to the 1930s, it made its first practical appearance decades later in several 1980s-era race cars.

In 2003, the Volkswagen Golf Mk4 R32 was the first production vehicle to feature the technology.

Today you can find a DCT in a variety of cars, from the relatively tame Hyundai Sonata to the brash, sexy Nissan GT-R.

How a DCT transmission works

DCTs are essentially two manual transmissions working in tandem.

One gear shaft contains the even-numbered gears, and the other contains the odd-numbered gears. While you’re accelerating in first gear, for example, the computer selects second gear on the other gear shaft. When it’s time to up-shift, the clutch that controls the even gears disengages and the clutch that controls the odd gears engages.

Compared to a traditional automatic transmission, gears shift much more quickly and smoothly in a DCT transmission – the perfect complement to a powerful, high-performance engine.

While DCTs are capable of seamless shifts, they can suffer from shudder or lurching at slow speeds.

Transmission fluid with specific frictional properties is required to prevent shudder. DCT fluid must also maintain the proper viscosity to provide protection during the high-heat operation native to high-performance sports sedans and supercars.

100% Synthetic Dual-clutch Transmission Fluid (DTC)

Protect the thrill

AMSOIL 100% Synthetic DCT Fluid is specifically engineered for sophisticated dual-clutch transmissions.

Its superior frictional properties protect against shudder and gear clashing to consistently produce fast, smooth shifts. When you are waiting on the light you need a fluid engineered to solve the “constant slip mode” which is occurring to work as if it had a torque converter. Slight engagement while you are on the brakes requires beyond expectations technology you only can expect from AMSOIL.

AMSOIL Synthetic DCT Fluid’s exceptional durability provides stability in stop-and-go traffic and excels under intense, high-heat conditions. Its built-in oxidation resistance helps prevent sludge formation in vital transmission parts.

Available in our 98th St store. Just behind the Marlins at the Tea exit. Exit 73 Sioux Falls.

Lookup Your Vehicles

 

5 Tips for Your Next Adventure Bike Trip

5 Tips for Your Next Adventure Bike Trip

I recently completed an adventure bike trip with my father during which we rode the Continental Divide from south to north. The purpose of the trip was to document the ride as a father-son duo and to show what the Great Divide Ride is all about.

Check out the video to see how our ride went.

I’ve ridden motorcycles for many years, and my father has been riding right beside me the whole time. My passion for motorcycles took hold when I got my first bike – a 1976 Yamaha DT250. Since then, I’ve gravitated toward more dual-sport riding. I’ve had lots of good times at the track on my Supermoto, and countless other rides with friends.

 


Until recently, I’ve never considered myself an adventure bike rider. Prior to riding the Divide, I had never taken a bike trip of more than a couple days.

Maybe you’re in the same boat. Maybe you’re yearning to leave your familiar territory and take a long adventure bike trip yourself. Before you embark, check out this list of things (in no particular order), I wish I had known before my trip. I am by no means a professional, so take it all with a grain of salt. There’s no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to riding.

1) Do your research

Educate yourself. Your level of research may change based on skill level, familiarity with your motorcycle and your planned route. But it’s imperative you don’t overlook this step. When preparing to ride the Continental Divide, I cannot count the hours I spent researching.

Understand everything you can about your motorcycle.

  • What are the known problems with the bike, if any?
  • How much money do you need to spend to prepare the bike?
  • Are you capable of fixing things if (when) something goes wrong?

Know your route, too:

  • What have other riders experienced on the route?
  • Where can you find maps and route notes?
  • How difficult will the riding be?

It’s crucial that you learn as much as you can before diving in headfirst. But, if you’re the type to just dive in, skip ahead to number 3.

2) Prepare yourself and your bike

Admittedly, I underestimated the importance of preparation.

For some people, this might be the easy part, but I am not the most mechanically inclined person. I tend to worry about causing some catastrophic failure if I make even simple changes to my bike.

Because of my lack of mechanical knowledge and my tendency toward perfectionism, prepping my motorcycle for this trip took longer than I anticipated.

With the help of my father and a local motorcycle mechanic (Roger, you’re a heck of a guy and a wealth of knowledge), we managed to address all of the known issues with both of the bikes. This helped us immensely when forced to make repairs along the trip since I knew the bike like the back of my hand.

Preparation also includes packing. I neglected to pack and repack my bike before the trip to ensure everything had its place. Pack it, unpack it, repack it and then take half of it away because you don’t need it.

And don’t forget to check the fluids and change them as needed before embarking. On a long trip, change the motor oil before you go. Use a good synthetic to protect your expensive engine no matter the conditions you encounter. Check the brake and clutch reservoirs, too. Make sure the coolant is in good condition and topped-off as needed.

Amsoil 15W-50 Synthetic Metric Motorcycle Oil

Buy Metric Motorcycle Oil

3) Get some seat time on your adventure bike

I always forget this tip. Just get out and ride – seat time is king. If you want to improve your riding and feel at home on your bike, spend time on it.

Also, anytime you change something on your motorcycle during preparation, test it out to ensure it was for the best. You don’t want to get 100 miles into your journey and notice a problem that a little seat time beforehand would have revealed. What would have been a simple fix back home then becomes a daunting task to fix on the trail. I have experienced this and don’t wish it upon anyone.

While planning this ride, I let time get away from me and we didn’t have the bikes fully assembled and ready to ride until two days before departure. Needless to say, I lacked adequate seat time to feel comfortable on the fully loaded bike when we finally did leave.

4) Convince a friend to join you

This can be the most difficult task to complete. While there is something to be said for the solace of riding solo, an epic journey is best with a friend (or friends).

Some of the best times on a trip aren’t those spent riding, but gathered around a campfire at the end of the day, sharing a couple cold ones and recounting the day’s events.

If your buddy is a city person, start with a one-day glamping trip, not a full-on, live-off-the-bike, no-showers, month-long expedition.

You’ll know which of your friends is best suited to each journey. Your friends may resist, but when they return from the trip, they won’t have any regrets.

I’m grateful that I was able to take this trip with my father. He’s no spring chicken and I know trips like this will be more difficult for him as time passes. This was a once-in-a-lifetime ride for us and I don’t take that lightly.

5) Don’t hold back – just go

In the end, know that all the work and preparation will be worth it and just get up and go. Pack up your bike and embark on your journey.

I’ve brushed off making the time for this kind of adventure countless times, and I’ve always kicked myself for it. There are millions of beautiful and unique places to go on your adventure bike. I bet you already have a few places on your riding bucket list.

Whether it’s a ride around town with friends or a ride around the globe, do whatever is required to put your kickstand up and roll down the road. Any effort it takes is worthwhile and the memories you make will last a lifetime.