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New Technologies Prompt New Industry Standards

NEW TECHNOLOGIES PROMPT NEW INDUSTRY STANDARDS

ILSAC GF-6 and API SP specifications. AMSOIL was already ahead of the game.

Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are under pressure to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. As a result, most new engines today use some combination of turbochargers, direct-fuel injection and variable valve timing to deliver better fuel economy and increase horsepower.

The trend of lighter engine oils to achieve these goals continues with 0W-16 viscosities emerging in the market and 0W-12 and 0W-8 expected to follow. The industry has responded to these ultra-light viscosities with two new oil specifications: ILSAC GF-6 and API SP.

We Were Are Already There

Our claims about using advanced technology aren’t just talk, and this specification update proves it. AMSOIL synthetic motor oils already meet or exceed the new industry standards and require no change in formulation. This is not the first time we’ve been in this position. While the competition works on making major formulation adjustments, we just have to update our labels. The new specifications are not allowed to be displayed on labels until May 1, 2020. Expect to see updated AMSOIL labels then.

The Big Split

The International Lubricant Standardization and Approval Committee (ILSAC) recently set a new precedent in the passenger-car motor oil market (PCMO) by splitting its specification into two parts:

GF-6A – backward compatible, provides protection for a variety of older and newer engines

GF-6B – not backward compatible, for use in select new vehicles

Both versions focus on wear protection, prevention of lowspeed pre-ignition (LSPI) and improved engine cleanliness. However, GF-6B features a more stringent fuel economy test. Engine oils can easily be identified as ILSAC GF-6A or 6B by the API emblem on the front label of the packaging. A shield will represent the GF-6B specification, while the traditional starburst will indicate a GF-6A product. Both ILSAC specifications meet the industry-standard API SP specification which is most commonly found in owners’ manuals.

To learn more, visit amsoil.com/lspi.

A Simple Way To Fight Cylinder-Liner Cavitation

A SIMPLE WAY TO FIGHT CYLINDER-LINER CAVITATION

In extreme cases, cylinder-liner cavitation in diesels can allow oil and coolant to mix. Then it’s just a matter of time until engine failure. Here’s what you can do to help ensure that doesn’t happen.

Most diesel engines are designed with replaceable cast-iron cylinder liners that are pressed into the engine block. While this doesn’t apply to turbodiesel pickups, it affects heavy-duty over-the-road trucks and other diesels. The piston moves up and down inside the liner, while a jacket of coolant surrounds the outside of the liner to cool the engine.

How cylinder-liner cavitation occurs

When the engine is running, the pistons move vertically inside their liners several thousand times per minute. Meanwhile, the rotary motion of the crankshaft applies a thrust force through the connecting rods to the piston. These contradictory movements cause the pistons to hammer the liners, causing significant vibration, similar to the effect of ringing a bell. This vibration can cause air bubbles to form in the coolant surrounding the liner.

When the bubbles rupture, they direct a high-pressure stream of coolant at the liner. Like a rushing river carving away a canyon wall, the coolant can erode the liner until cavities form. Left unchecked, these cavities can keeping growing and eventually penetrate the liner, allowing oil and coolant to mix. Once that happens, it’s only a matter of time before the engine fails.

Prevention is the best practice when it comes to cavitation. That task falls on the engine coolant, and there are two ways formulators typically design engine coolant to fight cavitation.

How Cylinder Liner Cavitation Occurs
Imploding bubbles direct high-pressure
coolant toward the cylinder liner, creating
cavities through which the coolant can enter
and mix with oil, damaging the engine.

The old-fashioned way

For years, formulators have added metallic salts, like nitrites and molybdenates, to coolant that attach themselves to the liner and form a sacrificial layer. When the coolant bubbles implode, the metallic salts absorb the pressure and break off from the liner surface rather than the metal itself. Metallic salts naturally deplete over time, meaning motorists must replenish them periodically by adding a supplemental coolant additive (SCA) to the coolant reservoir, typically midway through the service interval. Unfortunately, this is often overlooked.

The better way

The trend in the coolant market – and the strategy we use at AMSOIL – is to eliminate adding an SCA by formulating coolant with organic acid technology (OAT). The chemistry of OAT coolants passivates the liner surface, which coats it in a thin, inert layer that provides protection against cavitation and corrosion. Unlike old-fashioned metallic salts, the additives in OAT coolants last much longer, meaning you don’t have to replenish the system with an SCA. Modern OAT coolants also help fight problems associated with old fashioned “green” coolants, like scaling and additive drop-out (which leads to “slime” in your coolant system) due to incompatibility issues.

Coolant Maintenance is Key – Don’t forget about the most forgotten system

Aside from using an OAT coolant, it’s good practice to check your coolant level periodically. Also, make sure to check the pH and glycol levels annually. Glycol is important to the level of freeze protection and the coolant’s boiling point. Over time, the water can evaporate from the system and increase glycol concentration, throwing off the coolant’s balance. Perform fluid analysis once a year for best performance. We offer that service through Oil Analyzers INC. (www.oaitesting.com). We also offer antifreeze test strips (G1165).

Using AMSOIL Heavy Duty Antifreeze & Coolant (ANTHD) and taking care of your diesel’s cooling system go a long way toward avoiding the financial pain of fixing an engine ruined by cylinder-liner cavitation.

We keep this one in the Omaha store due to requests. If you need more than a case of four we can have it delivered next day or shipped to your home.

  • Pre-mixed 50/50 with high-purity water.
  • Fully formulated: DOES NOT require the use of supplemental coolant additives (SCAs) or excenders.
  • All-organic formulation is further enhanced with anti-scalant, anti-fouling and water-pump lubrication additives.
  • Phosphate-, nitrate-, nitrite-, silicate-, borate and amine-free.
  • Boil-over protection up to 265 F (129 °C) with a 15 psi radiator cap.
  • Freeze protection down to – 34 F (-37 °C)

An Eye for Detail Sets Kenny Hauk Apart

Performance From Paper to Real Life is Kenny Hauk’s Specialty

 

Kenny Hauk has built a solid reputation as a premier vehicle builder by virtue of not just doing a job, but doing it well and getting it right.

That keen attention to detail has launched a career that started in construction and has culminated in an impressive portfolio of high-end custom vehicles unlike any others. His work speaks for itself and lends new meaning to the term “performance-driven.”

Check out his trademark 1947 Dodge Power Wagon.

 

Watch it all go down on “Hauk Machines”

Hauk’s latest build is sure to reset the bar for performance. As dramatized in the season-three premier of “Hauk Machines,” Hauk’s crew tackles a rebuild of a 1974 Unimog for his clients at Bilstein Shocks. Check it out here.

 

 

Kenny Hauk visits AMSOIL for the Hellephant

While you’re at it, watch the previous two seasons of “Hauk Machines.”

Episode 11 of season two documents the trip Kenny Hauk and his crew made to AMSOIL headquarters here in Superior, Wis., to test out their Hellephant crate engine in the AMSOIL dyno.

It was an exciting time for our mechanical lab team to work alongside Hauk as they pushed the engine toward their goal of 1,000 hp. It did not go without incident.

Check out our behind-the-scenes look at how it all went down.

Hauk never fails to disappoint with the quality of his builds and his attention to detail. Learn more about how Kenny Hauk came to be a force to be reckoned with in the competitive world of off-road builds.

 

Don’t Give Up! The Secrete to Fixing a Lawnmower Pull Cord

How to Fix a Lawnmower Pull Cord

Few things are more frustrating than going to cut the grass or clear your driveway of snow and ending up with the starter cord in your hand. Eventually, it happens to everyone. When it does, check out this video on how to fix a lawnmower pull cord.

Steps for fixing a lawnmower pull cord

1) Remove the recoil

First, remove the recoil from the engine. Most are held in place with three to five bolts. After removing the recoil, remove the broken cord.

2) Measure and cut the old cord

Next, measure the old pull cord. Add about four inches to the overall length to account for the knots you need to tie on either end. Add additional length as needed if the cord broke farther from the handle.

Most of the time, however, the cord will break at the handle. In this case, you can simply reuse the existing cord. However, consider upgrading to a high-quality nylon cord for added durability.

Cut the rope to the appropriate length. Then, use a lighter to melt the ends. This seals the fibers and makes it much easier to thread the cord.

But the best seller is the ASE – Commercial 10W-30 which also qualifies as a SAE-30 weight. Available in Quarts, Gallons, cases and drums. It has all the components deleted from the automotive motor oils. No emission systems allows an oil more robust for these small sumps!

3) Tie on the handle

Remove the old lawnmower pull cord from the handle, feed through the new cord and tie a simple knot. Make sure the knot is nice and tight. Pull it back through the handle to help tighten the knot.

4) Load the recoil spring

The next thing you’re going to do is load the recoil spring. Turn the recoil in the direction that causes the engagement lugs to protrude. The engagement lugs connect the recoil to the engine and spin the flywheel.

Continue turning the recoil, making sure to apply enough pressure to prevent the spring from releasing and bloodying your knuckles.

Once you feel full tension on the spring, locate the hole on the pulley through which the starter cord threads. Align it with the outside hole on the recoil body.

5) Thread the new pull cord

With the two holes aligned, thread the new cord through about 12 inches. Make sure the cord isn’t tangled and then slowly release pressure on the recoil, letting it wind the cord for you until the handle is sitting against the recoil.

Next, tie a knot on the end of the cord. Pull the handle until the knot you just tied locks into place in the recoil pulley. Slowly let the cord retract.

6) Reattach the recoil to the engine

Finally, attach the recoil to the engine and you’re done. You just fixed your lawnmower pull cord.

What if the cord is too long?

You don’t have to go back and do everything over. Mark with a Sharpie where the cord meets the recoil. That’s where the handle should be.

Pull the cord out, keeping tension on the recoil. Make a loose knot near the recoil.

This provides slack to make a new knot where you made your mark earlier. Tie a good, tight knot and pull the cord back out, again keeping some pressure on the recoil so it doesn’t snap back. Untie the temporary knot you made earlier.

That’s how you fix a lawnmower pull cord. You’re ready to get back to cutting the lawn or blowing snow.

And for our Local customers, thank you for supporting our local store and local business!! We love Omaha our home town!

Ultimate Protection for Competition Diesel Engines

Ultimate Protection for Competition Diesel Engines

Whether competing in sled pulls, drag races or dyno challenges, competitors using DOMINATOR® 20W-50 Competition Diesel Oil enjoy the confidence and security that come with providing their diesel trucks maximum protection and performance.

Racing and high-performance diesel engines are modified to deliver maximum horsepower and torque. Their powerful designs create shearing forces that can cause oils to lose viscosity, leaving bearings, pistons and other components vulnerable to wear and failure. DOMINATOR Competition Diesel Oil delivers 50 percent more film thickness* to withstand high cylinder pressures and protect against wear. It is heavily fortified with zinc and phosphorus anti-wear additives to provide additional protection against scuffing and wear in severe conditions.

  • Competition-grade technology formulated specifically to deliver maximum power and protection in performance-modified diesel engines
  • Extra zinc and phosphorus for bulletproof wear protection
  • Fights oil breakdown under the extreme temperatures and pressures of competition, extending the lives of cylinders, rings, cranks, rods, turbochargers and bearings
  • High-viscosity formulation provides an extra level of protection, while offsetting the negative effects of fuel dilution
  • Delivers superior shear stability to withstand the intense stress and compression common to high-horsepower diesel trucks
  • May be used in any diesel engine calling for an API CK-4, CJ-4, CI-4+ or CH-4 diesel oil

 

*compared to the 3.5cP HTHS limit for SAE 15W-40

Not kept in stock at this time as it’s a niche product. Call ahead and order and we’ll have it here in 2-3 days or shipped to your door at the best price.