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Amsoil Diesel Fuel Additives Best Choice For Increased Fuel Lubricity

Our Diesel Fuel Additives Will Save Your Fuel System and Add Performance

Diesel fuel additives are the most overlooked motor maintenance item next to motor oil. An essential product that must be added to every tank. Many diesel drivers mistakenly think a fuel lubricant is okay every other tank.

New diesel owners are not being told this critical information from the dealership. 

Adequate diesel fuel lubricity is essential for protecting the highly engineered components in modern diesel engines, particularly high-pressure common-rail (HPCR) engines, which are subject to increased wear and deposits that interfere with an optimum spray pattern, reducing power and fuel economy. Many diesel owners add two-stroke oil to their fuel for added lubricity. AMSOIL delivers a better solution that provides additional benefits.

Amsoils diesel fuel additive selection

ULSD Provides Less Lubricity

Diesel fuel has traditionally had high lubrication properties, but the desulfurization process that allows fuel to meet modern ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) requirements also strips it of organic compounds responsible for lubrication. Although the ASTM D975 standard for diesel fuel provides a minimum level of lubricity, it’s not as much as the Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA) has called for.

To meet government mandates for reduced emissions, nearly all diesel fuel sold in North America is ULSD, which contains a maximum of just 15 ppm sulfur, compared to traditional diesel fuel that contained up to 5,000 ppm prior to EPA regulations taking effect in 2006. ULSD is also compatible with modern exhaust treatment devices, such as diesel particulate filters (DPF), that also help reduce emissions.

The Two Stroke Oil Remedy

Because lost fuel lubricity and the expenses associated with fuel-pump and injector replacements are serious concerns among diesel enthusiasts, some have adopted the practice of adding a little two stroke or 2 cycle oil to the fuel to replenish the lost lubricating properties. While this is generally a safe practice, it’s not recommended. Because all two-stroke oils are different, it’s a guessing game regarding how much oil is required to achieve a lubricity benefit. Using too little may not provide any benefit, while using too much may violate EPA laws regarding ash content.

The Superior Remedy: AMSOIL Diesel Fuel Additives

The best way to increase fuel lubricity is to use a fuel additive designed specifically for this purpose, like AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean (ADF – Our best seller), Diesel All-In-One or Diesel Injector Clean + Cetane Boost. These additives also provide specific additional benefits designed to keep diesel engines operating at top performance. Some say they can hear the difference. Omaha is starting to discover the AMSOIL difference now! We are keeping more and more cases so buy your months supply. We keep loads in inventory.

Lubricity Test

The ASTM D6079 High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) lubricity test simulates wear in high-shear conditions, measuring fuel lubricity by rubbing a steel ball on a plate in a bath of fuel and measuring the wear scar. Independent testing reveals Diesel Injector Clean provides superior fuel lubricity over untreated fuel and fuel treated with two-stroke oil.

  • Better lubricity
  • Clean fuel system
  • Avoid EPA violations

August 2019 amsoil dealer magazine

We have plenty of supply here in Sioux Falls. Stan Houston’s and at our Tea Exit location by Marlins.

Diesel Fuel Injector Problems: An Easy Solution

Diesel Owners Need to be Fuel (Injector) Experts

It feels like forever ago, but it’s only been 13 years since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated reduced sulfur content in diesel fuel, in 2006.

Boy, were people angry. They knew sulfur helped protect their fuel pump and injectors from failure. Change is scary, and the thought of replacing expensive components even more so.

Diesel fuel injector problems more pronounced today

Fast-forward to today. I rarely hear anyone talking about this. But the problem is even more prevalent now than it was then. Modern diesels demand even more from the fuel pump and injectors than before, increasing the potential for failure. So, why aren’t people still up in arms?

My hunch is they have accepted the new reality. Or, they just don’t know what they don’t know when they buy a new truck today.

Today’s ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) provides significantly reduced lubricity – a critical property in controlling fuel-pump and injector wear.

ULSD provides insufficient lubricity

While diesel fuel has traditionally had high lubrication properties, the de-sulfurization process that’s used to strip the diesel fuel of the sulfur content to meet ULSD requirements also strips the fuel of some of its organic compounds responsible for lubrication.

The ASTM D975 diesel-fuel standard mandates a minimum lubricity level. However, the Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA) wants the standard to provide for increased lubricity. But, while the EMA claims there’s a problem, it doesn’t carry enough clout to change the specification.

Since 2006, ULSD has accounted for nearly all diesel available in North America. Why? Because the EPA mandated reduced sulfur to curb harmful emissions.

ULSD now contains a maximum of just 15 ppm sulfur, compared to fuel that had up to 5,000 ppm sulfur prior to EPA regulations.

Waxes in diesel fuel lubricate the fuel pump and injectors, helping fight wear. Without them, the highly engineered components in modern diesels, particularly high-pressure common-rail (HPCR) engines, can wear out and cost thousands in repairs.

Today’s highly engineered diesel fuel injectors can suffer from even minimal deposits.

Diesel injector deposits kill performance

They can also develop deposits that interfere with an optimum spray pattern, reducing power and fuel economy.

The editors of Diesel Power Magazine covered the ULSD problem in the April and May 2019 issues.

As reported, the Bosch CP4.2 fuel pump that comes stock on 2011-2016 Duramax engines has led to thousands of catastrophic failures. It has culminated in class-action lawsuits in Texas and California against BoschGM, Ford and other vehicle manufacturers on behalf of individual diesel owners whose vehicles use that pump.

Diesel fuel pump failure costs big bucks

When the CP4.2 fuel pump fails, it instantly contaminates the entire fuel system with metal particulates, costing $8,000 to $12,000 in repairs. The magazine reiterates what AMSOIL has been saying for years:

“The way to be proactive in protecting a CP4.2 equipped diesel from an early demise is being diligent about using fuel additives that add lubricity with every fill-up.”

Diesel Power Magazine

The CP4.2 pump is said to fail because of two reasons:

1) It’s designed with about 20 percent reduced flow volume than the previous generation pump, requiring it to work even harder.

2) ULSD isn’t providing enough lubricity.

 

Our testing of base fuels across the U.S. confirms the second point.

ASTM D975 requires diesel fuel to limit the wear scar in lubricity testing to 520 microns. The EMA, meanwhile, sets its own, stricter requirement of 460 microns.

As the chart shows, many of the fuels (blue bars) failed to limit wear to 520 microns. And none of them met the EMA’s 460-micron limit.

Diesel Fuel Additive lubricity Improvement

Fuel treated with AMSOIL Diesel All-In-One performed far better (red bars). It not only met the ASTM D975 standard, it also met stricter EMA lubricity requirement.

Buy AMSOIL Diesel All-in-One

You can find the same technology in AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean and Diesel Injector Clean + Cetane Boost.

Buy AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean

Buy AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean + Cetane Boost

Our diesel additives deliver a healthy boost in lubricity to help lubricate diesel fuel pumps and injectors. The extra lubrication helps prevent wear in fuel pumps and injectors. They’re also great for maximum winter performance, too.

I strongly recommend that all diesel owners use AMSOIL diesel fuel additives with every tank of fuel.

Why Motor Oil Deteriorates

Why Motor Oil Deteriorates

 

Like just about everything else, motor oil has a lifespan. Even the best oils eventually require you to change them. Historically, many motorists like the convenience of changing oil with the seasons, visiting the quick lube or pulling the ramps out of their garage each spring and fall.

Motor oil can deteriorate by becoming contaminated, the additives depleting over time or both.

How oil becomes contaminated

Base oils are the backbone of the finished lubricant that ends up in your engine. They can be conventional, synthetic or a combination thereof. They’re responsible for lubricating components, which reduces friction and protects against wear.

Base oils can lose their effectiveness over time due to a few different factors.

Oxidation – The interaction between oxygen molecules and motor oil molecules naturally leads to chemical breakdown. Just as oxygen causes a cut apple to brown or exposed metal to rust, it breaks down base oils and reduces motor oil’s effectiveness. Oxidation can lead to increased oil viscosity, which negatively affects energy efficiency. It also causes the formation of harmful deposits and sludge.

High heat – Today’s engines run hotter than ever before, with temperatures up to 235°F, and even higher if towing or hauling. The rate of oxidation for oil doubles for every 18°F increase in temperature.

Moisture – Your vehicle is also subjected to temperature swings, even when it is parked in the garage. Those temperature swings cause condensation to form inside your engine, leading to water contamination. Leaving a vehicle parked for extended periods or taking short trips that don’t allow the engine to fully warm up allow water to remain in the oil rather than evaporating and exiting through the tailpipe. Water can lead to formation of sludge.

Viscosity loss – A lubricant’s viscosity is its most important property. Viscosity has a direct bearing on wear protection, and your engine is designed to operate best using a motor oil of a specific viscosity (e.g. 5W-30). The intense pressure the oil bears as it’s squeezed between moving parts, like the piston ring/cylinder wall interface, can tear apart, or shear, its molecular structure, leading to viscosity loss. Suddenly, the 5W-30 motor oil your engine was designed to use is now essentially a 5W-20 oil, and wear protection may be compromised.

Fuel dilution – Fuel can wash past the piston rings and contaminate the motor oil, causing it to lose viscosity. Frequent short trips that don’t allow the oil to reach normal operating temperature can be especially problematic because the fuel won’t volatilize and exit through the PCV system. Excessive fuel dilution leads to sludge and varnish, requiring the oil to be changed more often.

Additive are designed to deplete

Additives are added to base oils to reduce destructive processes and enhance beneficial properties. For example, antioxidant additives help slow the rate of oxidation. Detergency additives help prevent deposits and sludge while cleaning pre-existing deposits. Anti-wear additives are added to some lubricants to form a sacrificial barrier on metal components and help prevent wear.

Since they’re sacrificial in nature, additive depletion is one of the primary reasons motor oil loses its effectiveness and must be changed.

Though all motor oils eventually deteriorate, synthetic oils last longer than conventional oils and deliver improved protection against wear and deposits. They’re formulated with base oils that are more resilient to oxidation and heat, while their additives also typically offer improved performance.

In fact, AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil performs so well you can go up to 25,000 miles/one year between oil changes (15,000 miles/one year in severe service) if you want, saving money.

AAA Study Finds Synthetics a SIGNIFICANTLY Better Alternative than Conventional

AAA Testing Affirms Superiority of Synthetic Motor Oils

AMSOIL introduced the world to synthetic motor oil in 1972, and we’ve been extolling the benefits ever since. While we’ve been joined by many vehicle and equipment manufacturers and competing motor oil companies over the years, the American Automobile Association (AAA) is the most recent company to promote the benefits of using synthetics. The popular club recently conducted in-depth testing to determine if it’s worth paying more for synthetic oil over conventional oil.

The answer is a resounding “yes.”

“Oil protects critical engine components from damage and AAA found that synthetic engine oils performed an average of 47 percent better than conventional oils in a variety of industry-standard tests,” said John Nielsen, AAA’s managing director of Automotive Engineering and Repair. “With its superior resistance to deterioration, AAA’s findings indicate that synthetic oil is particularly beneficial to newer vehicles with turbo-charged engines and for vehicles that frequently drive in stop-and-go traffic, tow heavy loads or operate in extreme hot or cold conditions.”

AAA’s research included eight industry-standard ASTM tests focusing on shear stability, deposit formation, volatility, cold-temperature pumpability, oxidation resistance and oxidation-induced rheological changes. Each test was performed on five synthetic and five conventional oils. The results of this study by a reputable, third-party organization reaffirm what we’ve been saying for more than 45 years and give you one more reference point to back up your claims in the buy-sell process.

Click here to see the full AAA report.

Gone is the adage, “As long as you change your oil at 3000 mile intervals, I don’t care what oil you use, it will be just fine. Synthetics are a waste of money.”

AAA Finds Synthetic Lubricants worth switching to on several accounts

The above ignores many issues which this test and AMSOIL has outlined for decades. Not only that but it totally ignores the #1 reason for our brand which is performance.
An unscientific approach can also explain. If you imaging all the cars in the junkyard that are there because of an engine that failed I bet the majority of them did get their oil changed at 3000 miles. At least that is true if we go back to the 70’s. So changing oil too frequently didn’t prevent a seized engine due to loss of coolant or a lose oil drain bolt. Yes – Synthetics (true ones at least) could have very well prevented that breakdown.

Also severe wear due to fuel and acids in the crankcase which AMSOIL addresses but a conventional Group II base stock cannot. At least when considering their price point which limits the quality of the additives.

Synthetics as you see in this report excel in viscosity retention and oxidation resistance. Federal Mogul published a study years ago showing the majority of engine failures (I think the figure was greater than 85%) were not because of contaminants but because of a lack of lubrication, excess heat or corrosion. AMSOIL products address all these and their sub-categories.  Even if the subject changed the bargain brand every 50 miles, it won’t address viscosity loss when there is a overheating event causing deposits or metal fatigue.

Again the above are all features and insurance of Synthetics but the real draw is performance and is why I was sold on AMSOIL and later became a dealer thanks to it’s performance in 1960’s cars which I was told “It ain’t gonna work in them old cars!!” Lol!

 

Can I Use Diesel Oil in My Gas Engine?

Thoughts on using Diesel Oils in Gasoline Engines

It’s common for some owners of gasoline-powered vehicles to favor diesel oils over their gasoline counterparts.

An article from AMSOIL’s Blog by John Baker

The simple answer: Yes, provided the diesel oil meets the appropriate specifications and viscosity requirements of your engine. For example, if your gas engine calls for a motor oil that meets the API SN specification, you can safely use a diesel oil of the correct viscosity that meets the API SN spec. For the typical gasoline application, a diesel oil isn’t required and the more appropriate choice is a quality gasoline motor oil for both performance and value.

The detailed answer: It’s common for some owners of modified gasoline-powered vehicles to favor diesel oils over their gasoline counterparts. Many assume diesel oils are more durable and more capable of withstanding the increased heat of a powerful, turbocharged engine. Others lean toward higher-viscosity oils to protect against wear, and it’s sometimes easier to find a 40- or 50-weight diesel oil than a gasoline motor oil. Others favor the increased detergency of diesel oils. (which is my reason for using them in my 1983 AMC Eagle station wagon BTW.)

While you can use a diesel oil in your gasoline engine, provided it meets the appropriate specifications and viscosity requirements, there’s far more to the topic than that, as I learned after talking to Mark Nyholm, AMSOIL Technical Product Manager – Heavy Duty.

Can diesel oil safely be used in gas engines?

Mark Nyholm: It depends on the specifications the diesel oil carries and the recommendation of the original equipment manufacturer (OEM). The American Petroleum Institute (API) publishes its “C” category of specification for diesel oil (currently CJ-4) and its “S” category for gasoline motor oil (currently SN). It’s common for today’s diesel engine oils to carry both the API CJ-4 and SN specifications. Though they’re truly designed for diesel applications, they can be used in gasoline applications for those customers who want to use one oil in all applications. If the diesel oil carries both specs, feel assured the oil is safe to use in diesel and gas applications. If the diesel oil does not carry the “S” category, I strongly recommend against using it in gasoline applications.

Why do some motorists favor diesel oil over gasoline motor oils?

Nyholm: There are many reasons people choose the oil they use. Since oil is not top-of-mind with many motorists, it’s typical for people to purchase based on viscosity alone. Many gasoline engines today call for 5W-30, with more and more requiring 5W-20, meaning those viscosities are typically what’s readily available. So, if you’re looking for a 5W-40 or 15W-40, it’s often easiest to find that viscosity in the diesel engine oil aisle.

Others use diesel oil under the assumption it’s a more “heavy-duty” product and must be better than gasoline motor oils. They may have been told diesel oil is formulated with special components not available in gasoline motor oils, such as more robust detergency additives to handle the soot inherent to diesel engines. In their minds, diesel oils are analogous to better protection.

Do most gasoline engines really need some of the additives in most diesel oils?

Nyholm: Diesel and gasoline oils are formulated with a variety of additives that improve wear protection, corrosion protection, resistance to foaming, viscosity retention and more. Whether the application is gasoline-powered or diesel-powered, many of the same additives are used based on what we are asking them to do in the formulation.

Now, there are additives designed to manage the byproducts of combustion, and some of those byproducts change, depending on whether you’re burning gasoline or diesel. If you’re running a gasoline engine, it’s best to use an oil that contains the correct additives to handle the byproducts of gasoline combustion. The same holds if you’re operating a diesel engine.

When should someone use diesel oil in their gas engine?

Nyholm: If your gasoline engine is heavily modified to put out more horsepower, using a diesel oil can be beneficial. It’s likely modified engines will need a higher viscosity to withstand the increased stress. You can turn to diesel engine oils for those needs or you might want to consider a racing oil, depending on your engine modifications and lubrication requirements.

Many times the engine builder will help provide insight as to what success they have found. Outside of that, if you have a bone-stock gasoline-powered application it’s best to stick with a gasoline motor oil. They are designed for that type of application and have the components required to manage that engine. Sure, you can run a diesel oil in a gasoline application; however it’s likely the formula has additional components your gasoline application doesn’t require, which might end up costing you more money.

AMSOIL diesel for gas engines

AMSOIL formulates a complete line of gasoline and diesel oils for nearly anything you have. They’re dialed in to deliver outstanding protection for their intended applications. Consult the AMSOIL product guides for recommendations for your vehicle.

Sioux Falls has a LOT of classic cars.

Some of these are survivors (never been restored) which the motors have never been rebuilt. Assuming a good amount of deposits are in the engine, have no fear – AMSOIL synthetic products are perfect. One of the things that sets AMSOIL apart is the better quality seal conditioners. It is not a fact that “synthetics cause leaks”. The issue of causing leaks simply means that the oil is not engineered and built to prevent that. It happens more frequently with conventional motor oils of average quality due to profit requirements of the stock holders. That said our HDD (Heavy-Duty) Diesel AND Gasoline Engine Oil is often the best choice.  The detergents will help clean the engine while keeping contaminants in suspension while our high capacity Absolute Efficiency Oil filters remove the problem causing deposits. Many use our High Zinc AME Diesel 15W-40 as well for this purpose as it costs significantly less. Also be sure to check out our bypass oil filtration kits.  These partial filters will remove even more deposits you will never get out through frequent oil drains alone.  Guaranteed to filter 98% at 2-microns!

So here in Sioux Falls there is a better choice for all your engines. AMSOIL’s Sioux Falls dealer at 4610 W. 12th St. or call 402-933-3902.

Thank you!