Skip to main content

OE 0W-16: Light and Strong

OE 0W-16: Light and Strong

Now in stock in Sioux Falls. Exit 73 behind Marlins!

A 0W-16 viscosity motor oil may seem exotic to North American drivers, but as fuel efficiency requirements increase, it may become a common recommendation of manufacturers worldwide. Japanese engineers have long experimented with ultra-thin motor oils, and 0W-16 has been in regular use in Japan since the 90s.

The Benefits of Going Thin

Lower viscosity motor oil can increase fuel economy, and the pressure to create engines that sip less fuel has hastened the introduction of these viscosities to North America. The stated fuel mileage estimates for several 2018 vehicles were calculated with 0W-16 motor oil installed. Beyond fuel economy, lower viscosity oil can also provide excellent cold-starts in the most frigid temperatures.

See the latest updates via this product spec sheet covering the OE line. This link is automatically updated any time there is a change in data.

OE 0W-16 Synthetic Motor Oil

The primary concern with low viscosity oil is wear protection. Like the rest of the OE line, OE 0W-16 develops a strong fluid film that keeps metal components separated and protected. Our work didn’t end with simply blending a new viscosity. OE 0W-16 Synthetic Motor Oil (OES) is formulated with unique anti-wear additives that protect critical engine parts like pistons and cams. This added protection is particularly important in the extreme environments produced by today’s smaller-displacement engines that run on lower viscosity oil.

  • Provides advanced wear protection
  • Improves fuel economy & maintains low emissions
  • Protects pistons from low-speed pre-ignition
  • Keeps engines clean
  • Protects in all temperatures
  • Meets the requirements of popular new vehicles like the 2018 Toyota* Camry* and the 2018 Honda* Fit*
  • Recommended for use in applications that require the API SN PLUS (Resource Conserving) specification. Use only where 0W-16 is specified. Do not substitute for 0W-20 or other viscosity.

 

How Does a Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) Work?

The Function of a Dual-Clutch Transmission

Market Technology before it’s ready!

A dual-clutch transmission (DCT) is synonymous with high performance. Compared to a traditional automatic transmission, it delivers…

  • Faster, smoother shifts
  • Increased fuel economy
  • Improved performance
  • Surprise breakdowns (well they’ll solve that soon)

Although the DCT transmission dates to the 1930s, it made its first practical appearance decades later in several 1980s-era race cars.

In 2003, the Volkswagen Golf Mk4 R32 was the first production vehicle to feature the technology.

Today you can find a DCT in a variety of cars, from the relatively tame Hyundai Sonata to the brash, sexy Nissan GT-R.

How a DCT transmission works

DCTs are essentially two manual transmissions working in tandem.

One gear shaft contains the even-numbered gears, and the other contains the odd-numbered gears. While you’re accelerating in first gear, for example, the computer selects second gear on the other gear shaft. When it’s time to up-shift, the clutch that controls the even gears disengages and the clutch that controls the odd gears engages.

Compared to a traditional automatic transmission, gears shift much more quickly and smoothly in a DCT transmission – the perfect complement to a powerful, high-performance engine.

While DCTs are capable of seamless shifts, they can suffer from shudder or lurching at slow speeds.

Transmission fluid with specific frictional properties is required to prevent shudder. DCT fluid must also maintain the proper viscosity to provide protection during the high-heat operation native to high-performance sports sedans and supercars.

100% Synthetic Dual-clutch Transmission Fluid (DTC)

Protect the thrill

AMSOIL 100% Synthetic DCT Fluid is specifically engineered for sophisticated dual-clutch transmissions.

Its superior frictional properties protect against shudder and gear clashing to consistently produce fast, smooth shifts. When you are waiting on the light you need a fluid engineered to solve the “constant slip mode” which is occurring to work as if it had a torque converter. Slight engagement while you are on the brakes requires beyond expectations technology you only can expect from AMSOIL.

AMSOIL Synthetic DCT Fluid’s exceptional durability provides stability in stop-and-go traffic and excels under intense, high-heat conditions. Its built-in oxidation resistance helps prevent sludge formation in vital transmission parts.

Available in our 98th St store. Just behind the Marlins at the Tea exit. Exit 73 Sioux Falls.

Lookup Your Vehicles

 

Low-viscosity doesn’t mean low quality

Low-viscosity doesn’t mean low quality

As motor oil viscosity continues to decrease, base oil and additive quality become more important.

Michael Meuli | VICE PRESIDENT, TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT

Despite uncertainty surrounding future CAFÉ standards, fuel economy remains the biggest driver of innovation in the auto industry. One strategy for increasing fuel economy involves reducing energy lost to friction. Using lower-viscosity lubricants, which reduce pumping losses and flow easier at startup, helps automakers accomplish this goal. Just as we’ve become accustomed to 0W-20 oils, 0W-16 oil has entered the market and is recommended for the 2018 Toyota Camry and Honda Fit. People are wondering how much lower viscosity can go.

That’s because excessively low lubricant viscosity can reduce wear protection. Some people fear the fuel economy gains of modern low-viscosity oils aren’t worth the potential loss of wear protection. You should be familiar with the relationship between lubricant viscosity and wear protection, but it bears repeating.

Motor oil must develop a durable fluid film that separates engine components so they don’t rub together and wear out. As a rule of thumb, the higher the oil’s viscosity, the thicker the fluid film – and the better the wear protection.

That being the case, you might think it advantageous to throw out your 0W-20 motor oil and use 15W-50 instead. That’s a bad idea, and here’s why.

Modern engines are built with tighter clearances between parts than their predecessors. Let’s take the GM* 3.8L engines we test in our mechanical lab as an example. The clearances between the crankshaft journals and main bearings can be as low as .0007 inches. That’s thinner than a sheet of paper (about .004 inches).

During operation, oil continuously flows through tiny ports in the crankshaft journals to lubricate the journal/ bearing interfaces. It should form a strong, consistent oil film on which the crankshaft journals float as they spin, preventing them from touching the bearings. This is called hydrodynamic lubrication. Oil that’s too thick for the engine, however, may not flow fast enough to fill the clearances, allowing the high spots on metal surfaces to contact. This is called boundary lubrication.

In this case, using a higher viscosity oil than what’s recommended in your modern engine would lead to increased wear. Adding insult to injury, it would reduce fuel economy and increase operating temperatures as well.

Viscosity that’s too low, however, can have the opposite effect. Since viscosity is related to film thickness, low-viscosity oil may not develop an adequate fluid film to keep metal components separated, leading to wear. If bad enough, parts will eventually weld together and destroy the engine.

You can see how modern engines have put oil formulators into a bind. How do we formulate low-viscosity oils that maximize fuel economy while also providing good wear protection in today’s stressful engines?

In a word, quality.

Although oil film thickness is related to lubricant viscosity, film strength is a function of base oil and additive quality. We start with high-quality synthetic base oils that offer naturally high resistance to heat and chemical breakdown.

The challenge, however, is that lower viscosity oils tend to be more volatile, meaning they burn off more easily when exposed to high heat. If you ever look at a motor oil’s NOACK Volatility, you’ll notice volatility tends to increase as the oil viscosity decreases. This is of particular importance since most new vehicles are equipped with turbocharged engines, which generate increased heat. High volatility can lead to excessive oil consumption, which causes the oil to thicken, making it harder to pump through the engine and reducing fuel economy. Oil that has thickened can also lead to deposits and disrupt the additive balance.

That’s why only synthetic base oils can be used to formulate a 0W-16 motor oil. Conventional base oils are too volatile to meet requirements of low-viscosity oil.

Additives, too, play a vital role in low viscosity oils. We talked about boundary lubrication earlier. When in a boundary lubrication situation, protecting against metal-to-metal contact falls on the motor oil’s anti-wear additives, more so than with higher viscosity oils. The additives form a sacrificial barrier on metal parts that absorbs contact and protects the metal surfaces.

Motor oil quality has always been important, but modern low-viscosity oils underscore the point. That’s good news for Dealers selling the best oil on the market.

To help you reach this market, we introduced new OE 0W-16 Synthetic Motor Oil (OES) last month. We’ll monitor demand for 0W-16 oils and introduce additional formulations if demand dictates.

In the meantime, brace yourself for 0W-8 motor oil, which is already being tested in Japan.

Lubricant Viscosity Explained

Lubricant Viscosity Explained

A lubricant’s viscosity and how it changes under different temperatures and operating conditions is one of the most important properties that determines lubricant performance and protection.

Viscosity can be viewed in two ways:

• Kinematic viscosity
• Dynamic (or absolute) viscosity

Kinematic viscosity is defined by the lubricant’s resistance to flow and shear due to gravity. To illustrate, imagine pouring two containers, one filled with water and the other with honey. Each fluid’s Kinematic viscosity governs the rate at which it flows. Since the Kinematic viscosity of water is lower, it flows faster. Kinematic viscosity, measured using ASTM D445 methodology, determines an SAE oil’s high-temperature viscosity grade (the “30” in 5W-30).

Dynamic viscosity, measured by the Cold Crank Simulator (CCS) test (ASTM D5293), is defined as the lubricant’s resistance to flow as indicated by its measured resistance, best thought of as the amount of energy required to move an object, such as a metal rod, through the fluid. It takes less energy to stir water compared to honey because the Dynamic viscosity of water is lower. Dynamic viscosity determines an oil’s low-temperature grade (the “5W” in 5W-30).

What does it mean to motorists? The lubricant’s viscosity at 40ºC and 100ºC is used to calculate its viscosity index (VI) – a measure of how much the viscosity of the fluid changes due to temperature. As we said, viscosity change due to temperatures and operating conditions influences performance. A lubricant that undergoes little viscosity change will generally perform better. A high VI indicates the fluid undergoes little viscosity change due to temperature fluctuations, while a low VI indicates a relatively large viscosity change.

Synthetic fluids generally have much higher viscosity index numbers compared to conventional fluids, meaning they provide improved protection to critical components over a wide range of temperatures. VI is normally reported on the oil’s product data sheet, like this one.

AMSOIL synthetic lubricants boast high VI numbers, meaning they’re more stable than competitive lubricants, so you can count on them to deliver outstanding protection.

Stiction… What Is It?

Stiction… What Is It?

By now you’ve inevitably seen this term in turbo diesel enthusiast magazines.  And if you own a Ford Powerstroke 6.0L diesel engine, then you likely have experienced it. Stiction… it’s a combination of two words. Static and Friction. What it really means is that there are two components touching each other and a specific force is required to get them to move relative to each other. Like your pen resting on your desk. It requires a certain amount of force to get your pen to slide across your desk.

Solving Stiction on Ford 6.0Stiction has been a marketing term in the turbo diesel market for about the past 6-8 years now with the issues that Ford has seen with their 6.0L diesel engine. It’s a HEUI motor that, unfortunately, Ford made a poor decision to crank up the fuel pressure while utilizing similar injectors to the 7.3L diesel and they just aren’t capable of handling the pressure. So what happens is the solenoid on the injector that controls when the injector fires wears and gets sloppy. That wear puts it into a binding condition and the injector control is lost. The net result is poor idle and throttle response.

So what have some savvy entrepreneurs done? They’ve come out with a product to improve on the situation. Unfortunately the problem is irreversible. You cannot replace wear with chemistry. So can it make it better for the short term? Yes. However it is truly short term and typically ends in injector replacement.

What is the magic chemistry in a small bottle that costs so much? It is a combination of detergent and friction modifier. The detergent goes in there and cleans up any deposits in the oil side of the injector to ensure the solenoid can fire as smooth as possible. The friction modifier goes in there and coats the two metallic components and provides a more slippery surface so that the increased clearance between the two of them results in less binding. Unfortunately this method doesn’t last that long and you have to either keep adding this special juice or just replace the injectors.

I’m sure if you are a 6.0L owner you are wondering what I could have done differently. Unfortunately, based on the design and pressures, I’m doubting whether there is a foolproof method to eliminate the problem. But there are ways to lessen the pain and improve on the longevity of those injectors.

First, you want to choose a high quality synthetic diesel engine oil, like AMSOIL, to ensure your injectors are staying clean and the oil is providing the best wear protection possible. Regular oil change intervals using a high quality oil filter is step two to this important process. And finally if you are trying to keep the oil side of the injector clean you better think about the nozzle of the injector and keeping that fuel flowing as Ford intended. Using a concentrated dose of diesel fuel additive, like AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean, will help keep that injector flowing like new.

One more thing for northern climate enthusiasts to consider is engine oil viscosity. Since the HEUI injector uses engine oil to build fuel pressure it is very important to ensure the viscosity of the oil is suitable to promote development of proper fuel pressure. Take a look into your owner’s manual the next time you are in the garage. Your book will tell you that a 5W-40 or 15W-40 oil is recommended in most conditions, however if the temperature drops into the freezing range, Ford recommends you change to a 10W-30. No mystery why that is. The lower viscosity of the 10W-30 will flow more freely in cold temps and help develop fuel pressure much easier. Something to consider as you plan your oil changes throughout the year. Perhaps a viscosity change in the fall is the right answer for you. Whatever you choose to do, be confident that AMSOIL has a full line of high performance turbo diesel products for your truck. Take a closer look at http://www.amsoil.com/shop/by-equipment/diesel-motors/

Photo courtesy Diesel Power Magazine

Synthetic Warehouse note: The lower viscosity does so well for the Ford 6.0 that our #1 seller thanks for various diesel forums is our HDD 5W-30. Reduce the stress on your Ford 6.0 and call us or stop in for the 100% Synthetic Heavy Duty Diesel 5W-30 (Product Code HDD)