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Things to Do at Daytona Bike Week

9 Awesome Things to Do at Daytona Bike Week

Ok, so you missed it.. Well it’s better without the crowds so here are some things to keep you busy in the heat. I’ll tell you what, there are a lot of chicks down there so plan for a good time.

March is here, and you know what that means – Daytona Bike Week.

And, with the 79th-annual rally set to kick off Friday, March 6, the “World’s Biggest Motorcycle Festival” is set to draw hundreds of thousands of bikers for the 10-day event.

We’ve been attending rallies for years, so we asked our resident rally experts for advice on what to do while at Daytona Bike Week.

Our list of must-do Daytona Bike Week activities

Hit the 23-mile white-sand beach

Daytona is home to America’s most famous beach.

And, whether you’re looking to get a tan or see the famous sea turtle hatchlings, 23 miles of beach await. It also has designated traffic lanes for bikes and automobiles, lending a unique riding experience over hard-packed sand. Your bike or classic car will love the salt.

Check out the rules, take a virtual beach ride and get inspired for your own travels here.

Daytona International Speedway

So, maybe this one isn’t such a surprise, but it still has to make the list.

Daytona International Speedway stems from the days when racers took to the beaches of Daytona to chase land-speed records. Now home to the iconic Daytona 500, it’s not just millionaires going around in circles on a track all day. You can find a mountain of activities on and off the track during rally week.

Top motorcycle manufacturers such as Royal Enfield, Yamaha, Kawasaki, Harley-Davidson and Indian offer free demo rides throughout Bike Week on the property.

Stop by Thunder Alley to enjoy live music, drink specials and contests.

Rockefeller’s Ormond Beach Home

On the Eastern Bank of the Halifax River lies the winter home of John D. Rockefeller.

“Neighbor John,” as he preferred to be called, took part in many community activities in the area and entertained such guests as Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone.

Having multiple functions until it was left unoccupied for many years, the City of Ormond Beach purchased the home in 1973 and completed restoration in October 1979.

Today the home serves as a museum, offering tours and exhibits throughout the massive home and grounds. Get more information here.

Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse

Just a short way down South Atlantic Avenue you will find another hidden treasure – the historic Ponce Inlet Lighthouse.

Climb 175 feet to the top of the tallest lighthouse in the state and experience world-famous views of the world’s most famous beach.

Find maps and more info on making this part of your trip here.

Daytona Beach - You need to check this place out!! I go every year. Chicks everywhere.

Daytona Beach Boardwalk and Pier

Who doesn’t love shopping?

The Daytona Beach Boardwalk and Pier is a combination of entertainment, shopping and dining options accompanied by scenic views of the Atlantic Ocean.

Among the entertainment options are indoor and outdoor rides. Racing enthusiasts (right here!) can enjoy a self-guided tour of commemorative plaques along the boardwalk.

Florida roads under the tropical shade bushes (trees).

The Ormond Scenic Loop & Trail

The Ormond Scenic Loop and Trail is a 33-mile loop traversing the natural scenery of northeast Florida.

Leave the Daytona Bike Week festivities for a few hours and ride this scenic loop with ready access to the Atlantic Ocean, state parks and trails. Make a pit stop and enjoy boating, hunting, fishing and hiking.

During migration season you can even find whales, turtles and dolphins. If you’re an outdoor lover like me, this is a must-do.

Learn more about the Ormond Scenic Loop & Trail, including maps and directions, here.

Daytona Bike Week means excellent seafood

What better place to enjoy fresh seafood than right next to the Atlantic ocean?

With more than 75 seafood restaurants to choose from, there is no shortage of fresh sea life and picturesque settings in which to enjoy it. The Ocean Deck Restaurant and Beach Club is situated right on the ocean and offers a relaxing environment with everything from fresh seafood to wings.

Looking for somewhere right on the water? Try Off the Hook at Inlet Harbor Raw Bar and Grill. Chances are you catch an awesome Florida sunset and maybe even see a manatee or two while enjoying your meal worm.

Cape Canaveral

For those looking for more of a journey than a jaunt, consider taking a ride from Daytona Bike Week to Cape Canaveral, Fla.

Located 75 miles south of Daytona, Cape Canaveral is home to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and the dreams of millions fascinated by outer space.

If you plan accordingly, you’ll arrive in time to witness a rocket launch.

There’s so much more to see and experience in Cape Canaveral, you should check out their website and make a day or two out of it.

The sun always shines at Daytona Bike Week (hopefully)

Let’s face it – for those of us struggling to get through another long, cold winter up north, Daytona offers a chance to soak up the sun and enjoy some warm weather. Simple as that. The Daytona area offers no shortage of opportunities to put winter behind you for a few days.

So, there you have it. Be sure to stop by the AMSOIL booth at the Welcome Center. AMSOIL oil changes and product sales will also be available at Daytona International Speedway. You can also buy products at Destination Daytona.

If you’re stuck at home, like me, and can’t make it to the rally, tune into Facebook , Instagram and Twitter to stay up to date on all things rally related.

5 Tips for Your Next Adventure Bike Trip

5 Tips for Your Next Adventure Bike Trip

I recently completed an adventure bike trip with my father during which we rode the Continental Divide from south to north. The purpose of the trip was to document the ride as a father-son duo and to show what the Great Divide Ride is all about.

Check out the video to see how our ride went.

I’ve ridden motorcycles for many years, and my father has been riding right beside me the whole time. My passion for motorcycles took hold when I got my first bike – a 1976 Yamaha DT250. Since then, I’ve gravitated toward more dual-sport riding. I’ve had lots of good times at the track on my Supermoto, and countless other rides with friends.

 


Until recently, I’ve never considered myself an adventure bike rider. Prior to riding the Divide, I had never taken a bike trip of more than a couple days.

Maybe you’re in the same boat. Maybe you’re yearning to leave your familiar territory and take a long adventure bike trip yourself. Before you embark, check out this list of things (in no particular order), I wish I had known before my trip. I am by no means a professional, so take it all with a grain of salt. There’s no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to riding.

1) Do your research

Educate yourself. Your level of research may change based on skill level, familiarity with your motorcycle and your planned route. But it’s imperative you don’t overlook this step. When preparing to ride the Continental Divide, I cannot count the hours I spent researching.

Understand everything you can about your motorcycle.

  • What are the known problems with the bike, if any?
  • How much money do you need to spend to prepare the bike?
  • Are you capable of fixing things if (when) something goes wrong?

Know your route, too:

  • What have other riders experienced on the route?
  • Where can you find maps and route notes?
  • How difficult will the riding be?

It’s crucial that you learn as much as you can before diving in headfirst. But, if you’re the type to just dive in, skip ahead to number 3.

2) Prepare yourself and your bike

Admittedly, I underestimated the importance of preparation.

For some people, this might be the easy part, but I am not the most mechanically inclined person. I tend to worry about causing some catastrophic failure if I make even simple changes to my bike.

Because of my lack of mechanical knowledge and my tendency toward perfectionism, prepping my motorcycle for this trip took longer than I anticipated.

With the help of my father and a local motorcycle mechanic (Roger, you’re a heck of a guy and a wealth of knowledge), we managed to address all of the known issues with both of the bikes. This helped us immensely when forced to make repairs along the trip since I knew the bike like the back of my hand.

Preparation also includes packing. I neglected to pack and repack my bike before the trip to ensure everything had its place. Pack it, unpack it, repack it and then take half of it away because you don’t need it.

And don’t forget to check the fluids and change them as needed before embarking. On a long trip, change the motor oil before you go. Use a good synthetic to protect your expensive engine no matter the conditions you encounter. Check the brake and clutch reservoirs, too. Make sure the coolant is in good condition and topped-off as needed.

Amsoil 15W-50 Synthetic Metric Motorcycle Oil

Buy Metric Motorcycle Oil

3) Get some seat time on your adventure bike

I always forget this tip. Just get out and ride – seat time is king. If you want to improve your riding and feel at home on your bike, spend time on it.

Also, anytime you change something on your motorcycle during preparation, test it out to ensure it was for the best. You don’t want to get 100 miles into your journey and notice a problem that a little seat time beforehand would have revealed. What would have been a simple fix back home then becomes a daunting task to fix on the trail. I have experienced this and don’t wish it upon anyone.

While planning this ride, I let time get away from me and we didn’t have the bikes fully assembled and ready to ride until two days before departure. Needless to say, I lacked adequate seat time to feel comfortable on the fully loaded bike when we finally did leave.

4) Convince a friend to join you

This can be the most difficult task to complete. While there is something to be said for the solace of riding solo, an epic journey is best with a friend (or friends).

Some of the best times on a trip aren’t those spent riding, but gathered around a campfire at the end of the day, sharing a couple cold ones and recounting the day’s events.

If your buddy is a city person, start with a one-day glamping trip, not a full-on, live-off-the-bike, no-showers, month-long expedition.

You’ll know which of your friends is best suited to each journey. Your friends may resist, but when they return from the trip, they won’t have any regrets.

I’m grateful that I was able to take this trip with my father. He’s no spring chicken and I know trips like this will be more difficult for him as time passes. This was a once-in-a-lifetime ride for us and I don’t take that lightly.

5) Don’t hold back – just go

In the end, know that all the work and preparation will be worth it and just get up and go. Pack up your bike and embark on your journey.

I’ve brushed off making the time for this kind of adventure countless times, and I’ve always kicked myself for it. There are millions of beautiful and unique places to go on your adventure bike. I bet you already have a few places on your riding bucket list.

Whether it’s a ride around town with friends or a ride around the globe, do whatever is required to put your kickstand up and roll down the road. Any effort it takes is worthwhile and the memories you make will last a lifetime.

Take a Ride Around the Milestone MX Track

Take a Ride Around the Milestone MX Track

Hunter and Jett Lawrence have had quite the journey to American motocross.

After following the path of other successful Aussie riders like Chad Reed and Andrew McFarlane, they traveled to Europe to transition their careers to a larger scale, eventually landing on the AMSOIL/Honda and GEICO/Honda teams for the 2019 season. With his Supercross season delayed by a broken collarbone, Hunter Lawrence decided to get some laps in at the AMSOIL West Coast Open Swap Moto Race Series. With little brother Jett tagging along, the two went bar-to-bar this past Sunday on the main track. Meanwhile, over on the amateur track, the Pee Wees were ripping it up, with an all-out battle to the finish line.

Swap Moto Race Series

AMSOIL is the presenting sponsor of the Swap Moto Race Series. Formerly knowns as Transworld Motocross Race Series, the Swap Moto Race Series runs a unique two-track format, which shortens the race day for riders in its 60-plus classes. The series also boasts free transponders and low entry fees. Consisting of three separate “mini series” (West Coast Open, Terra Firma, Fall Classic), the entire series runs from January through December. Racers travel to some of the most notable tracks in Southern California. Check out a series schedule here.

Check out last weekend’s track setup at Milestone MX Park below.

This past weekend we took a trip out to California to check out the third round of the AMSOIL West Coast Open at Milestone MX. We caught up with the Lawrence brothers, checked out some racing on both tracks and learned a little more about what the series has to offer. Head on over to our Instagram to check out our highlights from our visit.

Shop AMSOIL Dirt Bike products

As a part of our sponsorship with the series, AMSOIL will be offering contingency at the end of each of the three mini series. Gift certificates will be awarded for eligible classes for first through fifth place in the following amounts:

1st $200.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
2nd $150.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
3rd $75.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
4th $50.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
5th $50.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership

At the end of the day after about 40 classes had finished their motos, the Lawrence brothers went one/two (Hunter, Jett) in the 250F class. The brothers had some competition in the Pro Open (125-450) class, with Hunter finishing in second and Jett in third.

Be sure to tune into our FacebookInstagram and Twitter to see where we’re off to next.

We’ll see you at the races!

First Time Heading to Sturgis? We’ve Got Some Tips.

First Time Heading to Sturgis? We’ve Got Some Tips.

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is a true bucket-list destination for any motorcycle enthusiast. (Well except for sport or adventure riders)
Each year thousands upon thousands of riders descend on Sturgis, S.D., and turn this small, sleepy town into a motorcycle mecca. Some travel the road to Sturgis as an annual endeavor, while others make it a once-in-a-lifetime journey. In either case, there is always the thrilling experience of hitting the open road to Sturgis. For those taking their inaugural ride to the world-famous Rally the week of Aug. 4-13, we’ve got some ideas to keep in mind that will help make your first rally appearance a success.

Formulate a plan:

It’s easy to become overwhelmed with the sights and sounds of Sturgis. Leaving room for spontaneity is essential, meaning you don’t need a minute-by-minute itinerary. But having some guidelines ensures you are in the right place at the right time, whatever your dining/entertainment/riding needs. Before you leave, check out the various venue schedules to see what they have in store throughout the week and plan accordingly. Have some extra money for the $20 burgers and overpriced beers.

Prepare your bike:

Nothing is worse than a roadside breakdown, whether on Main Street in Sturgis or en route to and from the rally. Before you hit the highway, make sure your bike is roadworthy for the miles ahead. Check your tires for proper inflation and tread; chain/belt condition; brakes; lights and, of course, fluids. A fresh oil change with AMSOIL Synthetic Motor Oil will help your engine deliver peak performance despite the intense heat for which Sturgis is famous.

Pack accordingly:

Sturgis can get hot. Very hot. Bring light-colored clothing that breathes and reflects the sunlight. Long sleeves are a must to prevent windburn, so bring something light and easy to take on and off before and after the ride. Don’t forget sunscreen to keep you protected during the long hours you’ll spend out in the open.

Stay hydrated:

Did we mention Sturgis can get hot? Staying hydrated is key to staying alert and refreshed while clocking miles under the sun. Plan rest stops around gas stations and restock your drinking fluids often.

Be prepared for lots of bikes. And wildlife.

Driving alongside a large pack of bikes takes skill and confidence in your riding abilities. Be aware of your surroundings at all times and practice safe riding habitsto keep yourself and those around you out of harm’s way. Additionally, South Dakota has deer, bison, coyotes, sheep and other animals roaming the frontier and wandering onto roadways. Be alert to their presence and avoid riding at night.

Have Fun $$:

Most importantly, have fun and enjoy making memories at the largest motorcycle rally in the US. Expect to see thousands of enthusiasts who share your passion for riding, and hear a week’s worth of powerful exhaust and bike rumbles from every bike model imaginable. Expect to see AMSOIL, the Official Oil of Sturgis, welcoming riders in the Main Street booth just east of Junction Ave. and conducting oil changes at the locations below. When the 2017 event draws to a close, expect to leave while already making plans for your next trip to the historic Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

AMSOIL Oil Change Locations:

Adam Halstead – Rapid City Exit 55 on I-90 (near HD Rapid City)

Mark Miklos: Mad Dog Custom Cycles – Intersection of Junction Ave & Sherman St (across from HD)

Engine Detuning Kills Performance: How to Protect Your Motorcycle

Engine Knock Kills Performance: How to Protect Your Motorcycle

motorcycle banner

Some modern motorcycles are equipped with a knock sensor that adjusts timing to compensate for low-octane gasoline and eliminate engine knock. Unfortunately, when timing is adjusted, you may experience…

  • Rough idle
  • Lack of throttle response

Many bikers don’t even know this is occurring. Understanding engine knock, also known as detonation or pre-ignition, requires an understanding of octane, which is a standard measure of gasoline performance.

The three most common octane ratings include:

  • Anti-Knock Index (AKI)
  • Research Octane Number (RON)
  • Motor Octane Number (MON)

AKI is the rating most bikers are familiar with. It’s typically displayed on gas pumps as the average of the fuel’s RON and MON. RON, however, is the most common industry rating.

 

Engine knock can cause piston damage

Gasoline’s RON is generally a few numbers higher than the AKI posted on the gas pump (e.g. 87 octane fuel, or regular pump gas, has a RON of about 91-92). The higher the octane, the more compression the fuel can withstand before igniting. Low-octane gas is susceptible to uncontrolled and early ignition in the combustion chamber. It causes a knocking or pinging sound, robs the engine of power and, left unchecked, can cause catastrophic piston damage.

Engine knock may be eliminated by using a higher-octane fuel. Alternatively, you can use a fuel additive designed to raise the fuel’s octane number.

 

Boost Octane and maximize power and efficiency

AMSOIL Motorcycle Octane Boost increases octane up to three numbers, which eliminates knock or ping and maximizes power and efficiency.

octane_graph

An easy solution for engine detuning

Motorcycle Octane Boost offers a low-cost solution to engine detuning and helps maximize bike power and performance. It offers the
added benefits of maintaining engine and fuel-system cleanliness, with active detergents that help prevent deposits for improved efficiency.


Amsoil's motorcycle Octane Boost for maximum performanceAMSOIL Octane Boost

  • Maximizes power and efficiency
  • Improves startup performance
  • Eliminates engine ping or knock

 

 

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