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AMSOIL-Sponsored Chase Sexton Takes Supercross Crown

AMSOIL-Sponsored Chase Sexton Takes Supercross Crown

AMSOIL-Sponsored Chase Sexton Takes Supercross Crown

As I plopped down on the sofa with my second cup of coffee Sunday morning, I tuned the DVR to watch the Supercross finals from Vegas (#centraltimezoneprobs). I knew two things from watching heats and LCQs the night before:

1. Those whoops were pretty gnarly.

2. With temperatures steadily approaching triple digits during the day, the track was drying pretty fast, making it super slick.

But, I also knew that GEICO/AMSOIL/Honda’s Chase Sexton just had to finish in sixth place or better to secure his first 250 Supercross championship.

Championship within reach

Even if Justin Cooper (who sat 10 points behind Sexton) were to win the East/West Shootout, Sexton would secure his first championship by finishing at least sixth in the main event. Mimicking the patient, controlled riding style he’d displayed all season, the GEICO/AMSOIL/Honda rider sailed through in the top five, ultimately crossing the finish line in fourth place and securing a 250SX East Championship.

Initially slated to run in the East Coast series, Sexton switched to the West a week before the start of the season after an injury to Christian Craig. After breaking his collarbone while riding his mountain bike, the 2018 Rookie of the Year switched again back to the East. Cameron McAdoo stepped in, filling his vacant spot on the West.

Patience pays off

Consistently riding in control throughout the season, Sexton landed his first career win in East Rutherford, N.J. After an injury took front-runner Austin Forkner out of the title running in that same round, Sexton moved into first place with just the finale left to go.

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Qualifying second Sexton headed to the final in Vegas knowing what he had to do. In addition to Sexton’s championship, GEICO/AMSOIL/Honda riders RJ Hampshire and Cameron McAdoo capped the team’s night with second- and third-place finishes, respectively.

“It feels super good; it hasn’t really sunk in yet, being 19 years old and winning my first championship is unbelievable.”

Chase Sexton

“It was the longest 15 minutes plus one [lap] I’ve ever done; track was gnarly. Yeah, it was a super-sketchy track, and the whoops were gnarly. [I] had some moments with my teammate, and there were some hay bales knocked out on the track. It was really hard to decide if it was a good move or bad move, but it couldn’t have worked out better.”

Riding high from the championship fumes, the attention now turns to the outdoors with the opening round of Pro Motocross from Hangtown in Sacramento, Calif., just more than a week away.

As always, be sure to tune into our FacebookInstagram and Twitter to see how #TeamAMSOIL is doing and where we are off to next.

We’ll see you at the races!

Take a Ride Around the Milestone MX Track

Take a Ride Around the Milestone MX Track

Take a Ride Around the Milestone MX Track

Hunter and Jett Lawrence have had quite the journey to American motocross.

After following the path of other successful Aussie riders like Chad Reed and Andrew McFarlane, they traveled to Europe to transition their careers to a larger scale, eventually landing on the AMSOIL/Honda and GEICO/Honda teams for the 2019 season. With his Supercross season delayed by a broken collarbone, Hunter Lawrence decided to get some laps in at the AMSOIL West Coast Open Swap Moto Race Series. With little brother Jett tagging along, the two went bar-to-bar this past Sunday on the main track. Meanwhile, over on the amateur track, the Pee Wees were ripping it up, with an all-out battle to the finish line.

Swap Moto Race Series

AMSOIL is the presenting sponsor of the Swap Moto Race Series. Formerly knowns as Transworld Motocross Race Series, the Swap Moto Race Series runs a unique two-track format, which shortens the race day for riders in its 60-plus classes. The series also boasts free transponders and low entry fees. Consisting of three separate “mini series” (West Coast Open, Terra Firma, Fall Classic), the entire series runs from January through December. Racers travel to some of the most notable tracks in Southern California. Check out a series schedule here.

Check out last weekend’s track setup at Milestone MX Park below.

This past weekend we took a trip out to California to check out the third round of the AMSOIL West Coast Open at Milestone MX. We caught up with the Lawrence brothers, checked out some racing on both tracks and learned a little more about what the series has to offer. Head on over to our Instagram to check out our highlights from our visit.

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As a part of our sponsorship with the series, AMSOIL will be offering contingency at the end of each of the three mini series. Gift certificates will be awarded for eligible classes for first through fifth place in the following amounts:

1st $200.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
2nd $150.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
3rd $75.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
4th $50.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership
5th $50.00 and a Preferred Racer Membership

At the end of the day after about 40 classes had finished their motos, the Lawrence brothers went one/two (Hunter, Jett) in the 250F class. The brothers had some competition in the Pro Open (125-450) class, with Hunter finishing in second and Jett in third.

Be sure to tune into our FacebookInstagram and Twitter to see where we’re off to next.

We’ll see you at the races!

Why Steve Scheuring Chooses AMSOIL

Why Steve Scheuring Chooses AMSOIL

This Man is Living His Dream: Why Steve Scheuring Chooses AMSOIL

We all have dreams. Maybe it’s a trip across America on a Harley. Or the backcountry sledding trip of a lifetime. Maybe it’s climbing boulders and crossing ravines in a 1943 Willys Jeep. For Steve Scheuring, it was building a championship-winning Snocross team.

One day, 21 years ago, Scheuring decided to go for it. And he’s never looked back.

Today, Scheuring is a man living his dream.

It’s about racing and the community

Even though starting the team and giving up a nice paycheck was a gamble, Scheuring’s drive and determination ultimately paid off. His professional snocross and side-by-side riders regularly climb the podium at events around the country.

Scheuring believes in his people. His goal is not just to be the fastest (although that certainly helps), but to build a team in which his community can take pride. Every autumn, racers flock to his 23-acre industrial park in Aurora, Minn., where Scheuring maintains a practice track complete with multiple snow-making machines.

When he’s not racing, Scheuring chases wildfires for the U.S. Forest Service. It’s fair to say Scheuring runs on adrenaline.

AMSOIL and Scheuring: more than just logos

Scheuring’s relationship with AMSOIL goes beyond the AMSOIL logos on his semi or race vehicles.

AMSOIL has sponsored Scheuring Speed Sports since day one. Scheuring credits AMSOIL DOMINATOR® Synthetic 2-Stroke Racing Oil for saving his snowmobile following a coolant failure during a Snocross race.

In 2017, Lincoln Lemieux was 14 laps into the 20-lap race and going strong. Then he started slowing down and losing power. He pulled off the track and drove back to the trailer. The heat from Lemieux’s Ski-Doo RS600 engine was overwhelming. “There were parts of the engine that melted,” said Scheuring. “You could smell that antifreeze had gotten hot. Everything was just hot. That’s the best way I can describe it. Just hot.”

It turned out a $1 clamp had broken, separating the coolant lines and causing the engine coolant to pump from the system. The rubber O-rings that separate the cylinder from the head also melted, which caused the engine to lose compression and power. “There were a few other gaskets that actually melted inside the motor,” said Scheuring.

AMSOIL DOMINATOR Protects Scheuring’s Ski-Doo

In stock condition, Lemieux’s engine produces about 130 hp, but the team relies on piping, clutch, carburetion and other modifications to increase power by 20 percent. The modifications and lack of coolant exposed the engine to intense heat far beyond standard operating temperature.

“I believe 100 percent the reason that motor lived was because of the AMSOIL products.”“We go above and beyond the capabilities of these motors. If they fail they cost us money, they cost us time and they cost us races, and we can’t afford to lose any of those,” said Scheuring.

As Scheuring puts it, DOMINATOR Synthetic 2-Stroke Racing Oil saved his engine. “We’ve worked with AMSOIL the last 20 years developing two-stroke oils for our race sleds,” said Scheuring. “In my opinion, I believe 100 percent the reason that motor lived was because of the AMSOIL products.”

So, whether you’re riding the trails this weekend, or revving up the horsepower of your hobby car, we at AMSOIL love enabling you to pursue your passion.

Amsoil Products Help Team To Podium Finish In 24-Hour Motocross Race

motorcross team using AMSOIL

AMSOIL PRODUCTS HELP TEAM TO PODIUM FINISH IN 24-HOUR MOTOCROSS RACE

Each fall, the world-famous Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, Calif. holds one of the most grueling races in motocross – the 24 Hours of Glen Helen. Last October, Justin Dyar, of Chandler, Ariz., and four of his friends mastered the narrow canyons and tamed the wild trails to finish second in their class. And they credit AMSOIL products with helping them reach the podium.

 

A tough race for tough riders

Motocross is challenging enough in broad daylight. Imagine riding in the middle of the night.

That’s what awaits competitors in the 24 Hours of Glen Helen. Last year’s race, which took place Oct. 14-15, 2017, featured a nine-mile course that required competitors to ride every kind of terrain imaginable at the Glen Helen Raceway complex, including single-track, rock washes, ridges, an off-road truck racing track, narrow canyons – even the parking lot. “It gets pretty gnarly out there,” said Dyar. “There are parts where you’re going through canyons just barely wider than your handlebars.”

Riders began the course at 10 a.m. Saturday and rode continuously until 10 a.m. Sunday. “Going through those canyons at night is pretty sketchy because you might be turning right, but then you have a left turn ahead of you, so you go into a lot of the stuff blind,” said Dyar. Injuries are common, especially at night. This year, Dyar came up on a rider in the middle of the night who had fallen and broken his ankle in the canyons. “It’s a race, but it’s also survival,” Dyar said. “Everyone just wants to get to the finish line.”

Teaming up

Dyar, who started riding BMX as a kid before graduating to motocross, first competed in the 24 Hours of Glen Helen in 2015. The team didn’t finish due to rider injuries, but the experience whetted his appetite for more. So he approached four of his friends with whom he’d grown up riding dirt bikes and suggested they form a team. AMSOIL Dealer and lifelong family friend Paul Gullo, owner of Gullo’s Garage in Queen Creek, Ariz., was one of the team’s sponsors.

One dirt bike, 24 hours

The team used a lone 2005 Honda* CRF450R for the race, although rules permitted the class in which the team competed to use up to six bikes.

Dyar and his four teammates (Anthony Samora, Garrett Maxwell, Chase Thomas and Zach Burgett) structured the race so each rider completed two laps, then stopped to refuel and switch riders. That gave them just under an hour on the bike at a time. “You’re tired, but you’re not fatigued to where you’re falling down when you get into the pits,” said Dyar. During the night, each rider would take a short nap after his laps. “Somebody would wake you up when the guy before you went out so you could start getting dressed just so if he had an issue after a lap, you could hop on the bike,” said Dyar.

Although the bike had low hours, Dave Maxwell of Mesa, Ariz.-based X2 Motorsports, one of the team’s sponsors, rebuilt the motor prior to the race for peace of mind. The bike was essentially stock, with no performance upgrades.

When Dyar installed AMSOIL 10W-40 Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil (DB40) in the engine and transmission, Maxwell asked if he was 100 percent confident in the oil. Dyar said he wouldn’t run AMSOIL in his bike if he didn’t truly believe in it. Having failed to finish the 24 Hours of Glen Helen in the past, Dyar wasn’t about to jeopardize his latest attempt with a questionable oil.

Maxwell also suggested stopping to change oil midway through the race. The bike essentially runs non-stop for 24 hours, generating tremendous heat and placing elevated stress on the engine and transmission. Maxwell was also concerned about the clutch standing up. But the team elected to forgo a mid-race oil change based largely on Dyar’s confidence in AMSOIL products.

“I know it’s a torturous race, but I’ve never had an issue with AMSOIL my entire life,” said Dyar. “I had confidence that the oil wasn’t going to leave me stranded in the desert.”

Flawless performance

Other than adding a little oil to the engine an hour or so into the race, the Honda didn’t use any oil throughout the 24 hours. Plus, the transmission required no top-offs and the bike continued to start on the first kick all race long.


“I had confidence that the oil wasn’t going to leave me stranded in the desert.”


Dyar and his teammates rode through the night, methodically moving their way up the leaderboard. On the final lap Sunday morning, after nearly 24 straight hours of grueling riding, they passed the team ahead of them with just a few minutes to spare to move from third to second place in their class, finishing the race on the second step of the podium. “If I didn’t have the confidence in AMSOIL that I do, I would have probably wanted to have done an oil change at some point in the race, which would have taken about five minutes,” said Dyar. Instead, they pulled into second place with only two or three minutes left in the race.

“Without a doubt, if we would have had to change the oil, there’s no way we would have gotten second,” he said. “We want to thank everyone who sponsored our team because we literally couldn’t have done it without them,” said Dyar.

Throughout it all, AMSOIL Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil performed just as well as the riders. Despite Maxwell’s initial concerns about the clutch holding up, the oil delivered confident clutch feel and performance all race long, with no fading. “He [Maxwell] was thoroughly impressed by the end of the race.” said Dyar. “That clutch was solid the whole time,” he said. Other teams weren’t so fortunate, including one team that had to replace a clutch in the middle of the night.

Dyar’s confidence in AMSOIL products started when Gullo used AMSOIL products during an oil change on Dyar’s 2013 Ford* F-150. “I put 15,000-20,000 miles on an oil change and the stuff comes out just fine,” said Dyar. He was so impressed with the results, he started using it in his dirt bike, too. He just upgraded to a 2017 Ford Raptor*, which will soon be converted to AMSOIL products.

“It’s not let me down; it’s a strong oil,” said Dyar. “It’s nice running with the confidence that you’re not going to have an issue out at the track from the oil going bad,” he said.

Although rules for their class allowed up to six bikes, the team used a lone 2005 Honda* CRF450R for the entire 24-hour race.

Your Complete Guide to the 2018 King of the Hammers

king of hammers

Your Complete Guide to the 2018 King of the Hammers

Updated Feb. 6, 2018

Happy February, race fans!

Every year in this wonderful month of love, tens of thousands of spectators and more than 400 competitors descend upon Johnson Valley (a.k.a. Hammertown) for King of the Hammers (KOH). This week-long event includes five off-road races throughout the week, with the granddaddy of them all – the Nitto King of the Hammers – wrapping up the week on Friday. This race combines desert racing and rock crawling spanning 200 miles of grueling trails. It’s no wonder 40,000 people flood this otherwise deserted desert valley to witness all the havoc.

So, if you happen to find yourself in the middle of the California desert this week or maybe just happen to check out the live stream coverage, we’re about to breakdown everything you need to know before witnessing this one-of-a-kind event. Load up the RV, grab your bonfire hoodie and get ready for the world’s toughest one-day off-road race.

The Background

Conceived in 2007 on a napkin in a bar, the inaugural KOH was devised by two racers in search of bragging rights and a case of beer. Dave Cole, a championship rock crawler, and Jeff Knoll, a desert racer, sought to combine the best of both racing worlds and invited 12 pals to the middle of the California desert to race more than 35 miles with 12 checkpoints.

The first race was run in secret with no spectators or vendors – just a bunch of off-road/rock-crawling dudes having a bunch of fun. Ten years later, the race has grown into a full week of racing, with hundreds of competitors and tens of thousands of spectators.

The Race

Saturday, Feb. 3 kicked off racing with UTV/4600 qualifying and part one of the King of the Motos. Racing continues throughout the week leading up to the namesake King of the Hammers on Friday, Feb. 9. Competitors start side by side, with two vehicles leaving the start every 30 seconds.

Racers must complete the gnarly 200-mile desert/rock course and seven checkpoints in less than 14 hours, all while staying within 100 feet of the centerline of the course while stopping to rest. No chase cars are allowed, and any repairs must be done on the track by the racers or in the designated pit area. First one to cross the finish line encompassing all the above tasks is declared the winner and, subsequently, “King.”

The Competitors

What does it take to participate in the toughest one-day race on the planet?

First, you need a vehicle. Vehicles are unlimited four wheel drive and capable of competing in multiple racing disciplines (extreme rock crawling, high-speed desert racing, short course) termed “Ultra4 Unlimiteds.” Competitors typically compete in the Ultra 4 Series, but it is not a requirement. Past multi-time champs like Erik Miller are looking to take the checkered flag once again, but there will be a slew of newcomers hungry to take them down, or maybe at least just finish the grueling course. With only 17 out of the 129 cars finishing in previous years, carnage is sure to be witnessed.

The Spectators

If paying with cash only, having no cell service, scaling rocks to get a great view and leaving covered in dust isn’t enough to scare you off, the KOH provides an experience like no other. Tens of thousands of fans trek out each year for this “Burning Man meets Off-Road Racing” event, which some say resembles a scene from Mad Max. With no hotels nearby, the desert becomes flooded with RVs, campers and tents in this once-a-year resurrected city called Hammertown. And, with community bonfires held each night, you’re sure to leave with more friends than you came with.

And let’s not forget why all these enthusiasts trek out here: the racing. With highlighted spectator areas like the “Backdoor,” “Chocolate Thunder” and “The Hammers,” there are plenty of options for witnessing all of the KOH carnage.

Oil Recycling at This Year’s King of the Hammers

All visitors coming to Johnson Valley are encouraged to dispose of their motor and gear oils properly by visiting the BF Goodrich garage located just outside of Hammertown.

Stop by the AMSOIL booth inside Hammertown on AMSOIL Ave. for more information and to enter each day for a chance to win a free UTV oil change.

Don’t worry, it’s not too late to get your tickets to the toughest one-day off-road race on the planet. Spectator information can be found here. A complete schedule of events for this year’s KOH race can be found here.