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Amsoil Products Help Team To Podium Finish In 24-Hour Motocross Race

motorcross team using AMSOIL

AMSOIL PRODUCTS HELP TEAM TO PODIUM FINISH IN 24-HOUR MOTOCROSS RACE

Each fall, the world-famous Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, Calif. holds one of the most grueling races in motocross – the 24 Hours of Glen Helen. Last October, Justin Dyar, of Chandler, Ariz., and four of his friends mastered the narrow canyons and tamed the wild trails to finish second in their class. And they credit AMSOIL products with helping them reach the podium.

 

A tough race for tough riders

Motocross is challenging enough in broad daylight. Imagine riding in the middle of the night.

That’s what awaits competitors in the 24 Hours of Glen Helen. Last year’s race, which took place Oct. 14-15, 2017, featured a nine-mile course that required competitors to ride every kind of terrain imaginable at the Glen Helen Raceway complex, including single-track, rock washes, ridges, an off-road truck racing track, narrow canyons – even the parking lot. “It gets pretty gnarly out there,” said Dyar. “There are parts where you’re going through canyons just barely wider than your handlebars.”

Riders began the course at 10 a.m. Saturday and rode continuously until 10 a.m. Sunday. “Going through those canyons at night is pretty sketchy because you might be turning right, but then you have a left turn ahead of you, so you go into a lot of the stuff blind,” said Dyar. Injuries are common, especially at night. This year, Dyar came up on a rider in the middle of the night who had fallen and broken his ankle in the canyons. “It’s a race, but it’s also survival,” Dyar said. “Everyone just wants to get to the finish line.”

Teaming up

Dyar, who started riding BMX as a kid before graduating to motocross, first competed in the 24 Hours of Glen Helen in 2015. The team didn’t finish due to rider injuries, but the experience whetted his appetite for more. So he approached four of his friends with whom he’d grown up riding dirt bikes and suggested they form a team. AMSOIL Dealer and lifelong family friend Paul Gullo, owner of Gullo’s Garage in Queen Creek, Ariz., was one of the team’s sponsors.

One dirt bike, 24 hours

The team used a lone 2005 Honda* CRF450R for the race, although rules permitted the class in which the team competed to use up to six bikes.

Dyar and his four teammates (Anthony Samora, Garrett Maxwell, Chase Thomas and Zach Burgett) structured the race so each rider completed two laps, then stopped to refuel and switch riders. That gave them just under an hour on the bike at a time. “You’re tired, but you’re not fatigued to where you’re falling down when you get into the pits,” said Dyar. During the night, each rider would take a short nap after his laps. “Somebody would wake you up when the guy before you went out so you could start getting dressed just so if he had an issue after a lap, you could hop on the bike,” said Dyar.

Although the bike had low hours, Dave Maxwell of Mesa, Ariz.-based X2 Motorsports, one of the team’s sponsors, rebuilt the motor prior to the race for peace of mind. The bike was essentially stock, with no performance upgrades.

When Dyar installed AMSOIL 10W-40 Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil (DB40) in the engine and transmission, Maxwell asked if he was 100 percent confident in the oil. Dyar said he wouldn’t run AMSOIL in his bike if he didn’t truly believe in it. Having failed to finish the 24 Hours of Glen Helen in the past, Dyar wasn’t about to jeopardize his latest attempt with a questionable oil.

Maxwell also suggested stopping to change oil midway through the race. The bike essentially runs non-stop for 24 hours, generating tremendous heat and placing elevated stress on the engine and transmission. Maxwell was also concerned about the clutch standing up. But the team elected to forgo a mid-race oil change based largely on Dyar’s confidence in AMSOIL products.

“I know it’s a torturous race, but I’ve never had an issue with AMSOIL my entire life,” said Dyar. “I had confidence that the oil wasn’t going to leave me stranded in the desert.”

Flawless performance

Other than adding a little oil to the engine an hour or so into the race, the Honda didn’t use any oil throughout the 24 hours. Plus, the transmission required no top-offs and the bike continued to start on the first kick all race long.


“I had confidence that the oil wasn’t going to leave me stranded in the desert.”


Dyar and his teammates rode through the night, methodically moving their way up the leaderboard. On the final lap Sunday morning, after nearly 24 straight hours of grueling riding, they passed the team ahead of them with just a few minutes to spare to move from third to second place in their class, finishing the race on the second step of the podium. “If I didn’t have the confidence in AMSOIL that I do, I would have probably wanted to have done an oil change at some point in the race, which would have taken about five minutes,” said Dyar. Instead, they pulled into second place with only two or three minutes left in the race.

“Without a doubt, if we would have had to change the oil, there’s no way we would have gotten second,” he said. “We want to thank everyone who sponsored our team because we literally couldn’t have done it without them,” said Dyar.

Throughout it all, AMSOIL Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil performed just as well as the riders. Despite Maxwell’s initial concerns about the clutch holding up, the oil delivered confident clutch feel and performance all race long, with no fading. “He [Maxwell] was thoroughly impressed by the end of the race.” said Dyar. “That clutch was solid the whole time,” he said. Other teams weren’t so fortunate, including one team that had to replace a clutch in the middle of the night.

Dyar’s confidence in AMSOIL products started when Gullo used AMSOIL products during an oil change on Dyar’s 2013 Ford* F-150. “I put 15,000-20,000 miles on an oil change and the stuff comes out just fine,” said Dyar. He was so impressed with the results, he started using it in his dirt bike, too. He just upgraded to a 2017 Ford Raptor*, which will soon be converted to AMSOIL products.

“It’s not let me down; it’s a strong oil,” said Dyar. “It’s nice running with the confidence that you’re not going to have an issue out at the track from the oil going bad,” he said.

Although rules for their class allowed up to six bikes, the team used a lone 2005 Honda* CRF450R for the entire 24-hour race.

Your Complete Guide to the 2018 King of the Hammers

king of hammers

Your Complete Guide to the 2018 King of the Hammers

Updated Feb. 6, 2018

Happy February, race fans!

Every year in this wonderful month of love, tens of thousands of spectators and more than 400 competitors descend upon Johnson Valley (a.k.a. Hammertown) for King of the Hammers (KOH). This week-long event includes five off-road races throughout the week, with the granddaddy of them all – the Nitto King of the Hammers – wrapping up the week on Friday. This race combines desert racing and rock crawling spanning 200 miles of grueling trails. It’s no wonder 40,000 people flood this otherwise deserted desert valley to witness all the havoc.

So, if you happen to find yourself in the middle of the California desert this week or maybe just happen to check out the live stream coverage, we’re about to breakdown everything you need to know before witnessing this one-of-a-kind event. Load up the RV, grab your bonfire hoodie and get ready for the world’s toughest one-day off-road race.

The Background

Conceived in 2007 on a napkin in a bar, the inaugural KOH was devised by two racers in search of bragging rights and a case of beer. Dave Cole, a championship rock crawler, and Jeff Knoll, a desert racer, sought to combine the best of both racing worlds and invited 12 pals to the middle of the California desert to race more than 35 miles with 12 checkpoints.

The first race was run in secret with no spectators or vendors – just a bunch of off-road/rock-crawling dudes having a bunch of fun. Ten years later, the race has grown into a full week of racing, with hundreds of competitors and tens of thousands of spectators.

The Race

Saturday, Feb. 3 kicked off racing with UTV/4600 qualifying and part one of the King of the Motos. Racing continues throughout the week leading up to the namesake King of the Hammers on Friday, Feb. 9. Competitors start side by side, with two vehicles leaving the start every 30 seconds.

Racers must complete the gnarly 200-mile desert/rock course and seven checkpoints in less than 14 hours, all while staying within 100 feet of the centerline of the course while stopping to rest. No chase cars are allowed, and any repairs must be done on the track by the racers or in the designated pit area. First one to cross the finish line encompassing all the above tasks is declared the winner and, subsequently, “King.”

The Competitors

What does it take to participate in the toughest one-day race on the planet?

First, you need a vehicle. Vehicles are unlimited four wheel drive and capable of competing in multiple racing disciplines (extreme rock crawling, high-speed desert racing, short course) termed “Ultra4 Unlimiteds.” Competitors typically compete in the Ultra 4 Series, but it is not a requirement. Past multi-time champs like Erik Miller are looking to take the checkered flag once again, but there will be a slew of newcomers hungry to take them down, or maybe at least just finish the grueling course. With only 17 out of the 129 cars finishing in previous years, carnage is sure to be witnessed.

The Spectators

If paying with cash only, having no cell service, scaling rocks to get a great view and leaving covered in dust isn’t enough to scare you off, the KOH provides an experience like no other. Tens of thousands of fans trek out each year for this “Burning Man meets Off-Road Racing” event, which some say resembles a scene from Mad Max. With no hotels nearby, the desert becomes flooded with RVs, campers and tents in this once-a-year resurrected city called Hammertown. And, with community bonfires held each night, you’re sure to leave with more friends than you came with.

And let’s not forget why all these enthusiasts trek out here: the racing. With highlighted spectator areas like the “Backdoor,” “Chocolate Thunder” and “The Hammers,” there are plenty of options for witnessing all of the KOH carnage.

Oil Recycling at This Year’s King of the Hammers

All visitors coming to Johnson Valley are encouraged to dispose of their motor and gear oils properly by visiting the BF Goodrich garage located just outside of Hammertown.

Stop by the AMSOIL booth inside Hammertown on AMSOIL Ave. for more information and to enter each day for a chance to win a free UTV oil change.

Don’t worry, it’s not too late to get your tickets to the toughest one-day off-road race on the planet. Spectator information can be found here. A complete schedule of events for this year’s KOH race can be found here.

More Than Just a (Motocross) Number

More Than Just a (Motocross) Number

More Than Just a (Motocross) Number

Let’s talk numbers, race fans…Supercross and Motocross numbers, that is.

Every fall, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) releases the roster for the upcoming Monster Energy Supercross and AMA Pro Motocross seasons. The 2018 Monster Energy Supercross season is in full swing and the battle has begun for number picks for next season.

Riders don’t simply choose their own numbers. Well, most of them don’t, that is. Instead, they’re assigned a number based on a system that’s been in place since 2000, with some tweaking throughout the years. To someone unfamiliar with Supercross and Motocross, the numbering system is downright confusing, but over the years I’ve come to understand (somewhat) how the process works. But, initially trying to explain it is like trying to explain how to invest in the stock market to an eight year old.

So, grab your notebook and pencil and get ready to be schooled.

Number one

This one is pretty self-explanatory. Every rider covets the #1 plate since it’s assigned to the rider who won the series the previous year, provided he competes in the same class or region. A good example is defending Monster Energy Supercross champion Ryan Dungey, who would have sported the #1 plate in Supercross this year had he not elected to retire. If the defending champ switches classes or regions following the season, he will use his assigned professional number instead of the #1 plate in his new class or region.

Single numbers

Single numbers (i.e. 2-9) are reserved for riders who have won a 250/450 Motocross title and/or a 450 Supercross title. Winners of 250 Supercross titles are not included because those are considered regional. For example, in 2014 GEICO/AMSOIL/Hondarider Jeremy Martin won his first 250 Motocross championship. With available single-digit numbers of 6, 8 and 9, Martin choose #6, which he still holds today.

Career numbers

If Martin hadn’t wanted to choose a single-digit number, he could have picked a career number. There are more than 30 riders with permanent career numbers right now. Winning a national championship is one way to obtain a career number. The other is to finish in the top 10 of combined overall Motocross and Supercross (both 450 and 250) points (i.e. Eli Tomac at #3). Some argue this isn’t fair because 250 West riders don’t compete against 250 East riders, while 450 riders compete against an entire field throughout an entire season.

Another rule? Career numbers cannot be three-digit numbers, unless…

The exceptions to the rule

Currently, one rider – Mike Alessi – has a three-digit number. He had the number before the two-digit limit went into place, meaning it was grandfathered into the numbering system. Also, if #13 is the next number available, riders can refrain from using it if they’re superstitious.

As for the rest of you

Riders who do not fit into any of the above categories, yet still finish in the top 100 of combined points, are assigned a number (i.e. Christian Craig at #32). Numbers are assigned chronologically after single-digit and career numbers are chosen.

So, there you have it. Make sense? Consider this your study guide for the current season (test to be held after the Supercross finale in Las Vegas). Some riders (re)debuted their numbers at the Monster Energy Cup in October, while the rest followed at Monster Energy Supercross.

Next weekend all the Monster Energy Supercross action heads to Oakland, Calif.

We’ll see you there!

Can a 1943 Jeep Survive This? Check out AMSOIL Expedition Colorado

1943 Jeep adventure

Can a 1943 Jeep Survive This? Check out AMSOIL Expedition Colorado

For brothers Brad and Roger Lovell, adventure is always around the next turn, literally. Brad typically finds adventure behind the wheel of his off-road racing truck on a TORC Series track. Roger finds it during grueling Ultra 4 events. Sometimes the brothers even find adventure together, like when winning the Smittybilt Every Man Challenge during King of the Hammers week.

This summer, the Lovell brothers decided to take a different type of adventure.

Armed only with what they could pack into their three pre-2000 off-road vehicles, the Lovells, their sons, mechanic Jake Arbitter and AMSOIL video producer/photographer Wyatt Gruben scaled rock ledges and drove through heavy downpours to complete the 550-mile trek from Colorado Springs, Colo., to Moab, Utah.

Brad recently sat down with us to answer a few questions about AMSOIL Expedition Colorado.

AMSOIL: What was the purpose of this trip?

Lovell: The purpose of this trip was simply to see if it could be done. We grew up in the Rocky Mountains and, rather than turning around to go home after the weekend, we wanted to see what adventure lay on the other side of the ridge line. By using older vehicles, we wanted the experience of our forefathers and to pass it on to our children. Overall, we were looking to find authentic adventure in our backyard, and we definitely succeeded in that.

AMSOIL: Who went with you?

Lovell: There has been a lot of interest in AMSOIL Expedition Colorado from friends and associates. A lot of people wanted to go, but we needed to keep it simple and small to prove the concept. In the end it was myself and my 11-year-old boys (Adam and Byam), my brother Roger and his son (Parker), plus Jake Arbitter, who works for the team, and Wyatt Gruben to capture some great images.

AMSOIL: Is this the first time you have done this?

Lovell: Yes. The idea came about to see if the West was really still wild. Just like there was a time in history when cattle drives were drowned out by fences, we wanted to see if we could still cross 550 miles of the Rocky Mountains on only dirt trails. The answer? Well, we were thwarted by snow, road construction and large landowners locking gates on what appeared to be private roads. We made it, but with more pavement miles than I had hoped. With this experience, planning and a little luck, we will develop a better route.

AMSOIL: What are the makes/models of the cars that you drove?

Lovell: This is an adventure and we wanted to make it difficult. My brother and I grew up on similar adventures and, in all reality, this was equally a chance to pass the same experiences on to our children. We drove the following:

  • 1943 Willys MB (Brad) – we originally bought this as a pit-support vehicle and my kids took a great interest in rebuilding it. They helped me redo the engine, brakes, wiring, etc. before the trip.
  • 1986 Ford Bronco II (Roger) – this was Roger’s first vehicle when he turned 16. It has been through a half dozen builds over the last 28 years and has solid axles, a 5.0L V-8, linked rear suspension and has been narrowed 6 inches.
  • 1996 Ford Ranger (Jake) þ Jake built this Ranger while attending UNOH [University of Northern Ohio] and it sports solid axles front and rear and a lot of suspension work. It should be noted that this is Jake’s daily driver, and he drove all the way back to Colorado Springs from Moab.

AMSOIL: Where did the expedition start/stop and what is the distance between those two?

Lovell: We started in downtown Colorado Springs in front of the Antlers Hotel. It is a historic hotel located on the zero/zero block of Colorado Springs. We ended the trip overlooking the town of Moab on the Hell’s Revenge Trail. It seemed more fitting than the center of town because everyone goes to Moab for the trails and wilderness, not the town itself. The total distance was 550 miles, which we mapped on Google Earth and tracked during the expedition on an iPad.

AMSOIL: So, why are you wearing a garbage bag?

Ha! We had all kinds of weather on the trip. We were in a thunderstorm above timberline, which is not a good place to be. The head gasket in the Willys had just gone sour and we were all freezing cold. My “breathable” rain gear proved to not be waterproof and I was really cold. The only waterproof thing left was a trash bag. It felt GREAT to get some dry clothes on and stay dry!

To see what products the Lovell’s use, check them out here.

To sign up to see future installments of AMSOIL Signature Series, sign up here.

World’s Most Powerful Outboard Motors Rely on AMSOIL

monster outboards use AMSOIL

World’s Most Powerful Outboard Motors Rely on AMSOIL

Seven Marine, maker of the world’s most powerful outboard motors, has a saying: We move the people who move the world. The Germantown, Wis. company designs, builds and sells outboard motors that produce up to an astonishing 627 hp and power some of the fastest and most impressive watercraft in the world.

All that power places tremendous stress on their sophisticated motors, which is why they turned to AMSOIL synthetic lubricants as their factory- and service-fill lubricants after having previously used Mobil* products. We sat down with Eric Davis, Seven Marine Vice President, to get the story.

AMSOIL Magazine: What makes Seven Marine unlike any other manufacturer of marine motors?

Eric Davis: We build the most powerful outboards available on the market today. We use a completely different technological approach than any other outboard manufacturer by using the small-block supercharged V-8 out of the Cadillac* CTS V and applying that in its normal horizontal configuration under the cowl. And that really makes Seven Marine unique because all other outboard motors are vertically oriented. That means we can use the performance, quality and emissions advancements that are central to automotive engines and apply that to outboard motors for the first time. In addition, we pair the engine to a ZF* marine wet-disc-clutch transmission. We’re the only outboard that uses a transmission. Because of that, our motors don’t shift in the lower unit.

AMSOIL Magazine: What performance advantages does that design provide?

Davis: It allows us to optimize the lower unit with a twin-pinion, race-inspired design that’s smaller in diameter. That benefits us in high-speed-cruise fuel economy and top-speed capability. A twin-pinion also gives you a tremendous amount of durability.

So, when you use a horizontal crankshaft engine, go with a wet-disc-clutch transmission and finish with a twin-pinion lower unit, you really get an outboard that’s built completely different, which is how we’re able to deliver the amount of power and torque to the propeller that sets us apart from everyone else.

AMSOIL Magazine: Your most powerful motor produces 627 hp. On what type of watercraft are people using your outboards?

Davis: The vast majority of our applications are multi-engine, and the trend lately has been more quads than anything [using four engines simultaneously]. We address the market that’s called the ‘super consoles,’ so we’re talking about 40-plus-foot, centerconsole, off-shore boats. Four engines can be done using a boat as short as 43 feet and as long as 61 feet.

AMSOIL Magazine: Who’s buying your outboards?

Davis: By the time you find out what they’ve done or what they do, they’ve touched your life in some way, shape or form. We use as a corporate tag line, ‘The Power to Move Those Who Move the World,’ and that really came from the fact that our customers are exactly those people, whether it’s the northern hemisphere’s largest onion farmer or the family that owns the third-largest grain distributor in the world – all kinds of people like that. They have truly amazing stories.

AMSOIL Magazine: How do they use your outboard motors?

Davis: It varies a lot. In general, they use them for transportation. They’re moving great distances, and what makes the applications unique for Seven Marine is that they’re trying to traverse those distances at high-speed cruise. They use the applications for everything from island-hopping to poker runs to deep-sea fishing. We have customers in the Gulf of Mexico who are running 150 miles to fish the rigs, so they’re cruising three hours at 50 mph to get out there and fish. We have people in Alaska 150 miles from civilization. Generally speaking, they’re covering great distances at pretty good clips.

AMSOIL Magazine: Why did you choose AMSOIL synthetic lubricants for your engines and transmissions?

Davis: When you’re trying to deliver the most luxurious experience for the customer and deliver the most performance at this level of power, you really have to have the best of everything to make sure it works properly. And you have to be confident that you have the best lubricants to ensure you’ve got the ultimate in durability. AMSOIL, on the engine and transmission side, has been the best products we can find. That allows us to be confident that when we do a factory-fill and recommended servicefill with AMSOIL, that you’re going to get that same factory performance day-in and day-out.

AMSOIL Magazine: What did your own test results tell you about AMSOIL products?

Davis: When we started doing oil sampling from dyno testing and looking at the performance of the oil and its degradation, the AMSOIL results were superior than what we were using before [Mobil products]. We’re endeavoring to build the absolute best world-class products we can and innovate in the marine industry, so we prefer to have an oil that we feel is as innovative and technologically advanced as the engines that it’s going into, and that leaves us with AMSOIL

In Sioux Falls review our marine 10W-30 and 10W-40 4-stroke oil for the big blocks, the new Mercury 25W-20 and several 2-stroke oils for injection units both OEM and our famous HP Injector formula and the 45 year old 100:1 outboard pre-mix.

And our best seller – the highly stable and water resistant Marine Gear Lube 75W-90.