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The Cost of Owning a Diesel – This Product is Not an Option

Diesel Fuel Injector Clean

Diesel Fuel Additives – Not an Option in Diesel Ownership

Years of reviewing the effects of modern diesel fuel, mechanical issues, costs and designs of injectors, pumps, failures keeps the topic of the misunderstood fuel additive fresh in mind.

Impressive In The Field

As an AMSOIL dealer, one product I rank in the top three where overly positive feedback is almost always given at each sale is our Diesel Injector Clean (and lubricant).  Of course many of those sales were started because I suggested to the customer to try our brand over whatever else they were using. And the majority of the time the customer was not using any at all! But the results seem to be instant thus the higher level of feedback.

Diesel Fuel Additives at Stan Houston's

Display at Stan Houston’s on 12th st – Diesel Fuel Additives and synthetic oils.

What To Expect

I could list all the sales info, product points to know, etc. but you can easily find all that in the product listing or technical data sheet (printable PDF). I wanted to state some of the instant feedback and some savings you can expect!

  • Increased mileage beyond any averages AMSOIL claims. I hear 2 to 3 more MPG’s although that’s not advertised.
  • Quieter engine
  • Regens cut in half – That alone is worth it! Unique to AMSOIL’s formula.
  • More power under load – You’ll notice more with the Cetane Boost
  • Solved sluggishness when passing
  • Skip past expected injector failure mileage to next to none
  • RV’s – amazingly easier starts on seldom used engines
  • Longer fuel filter performance
  • Less water buildup in tank

Lubricity

This is the reason it’s not optional. Not AMSOIL but the industry says you need a lubricant added to every tank of fuel.
AMSOIL recently posted about folks using 2-stroke oil in the fuel. They admitted it worked but only offers a fraction of the lubricant needed especially in modern injectors which rely on products with years of development. The results can be in the thousands saved on repair or replacement costs.

A fuel additive supplier who visited at one of our AMSOIL dealer conventions made it clear. He used a 2015 Chevy Durmax diesel for example. He said in 10 year ownership you will ether spend on average $750 on fuel additives or $6000 to $10,000 in injector repair.

Much of the failure is because the fuel or the over the counter additive doesn’t address corrosion within the injector. The wear resulting which is not visible without a microscope can be devastating to your engines efficiency. The injectors these days usually only have 1 to 2 microns of space around them so you cannot afford even the slightest  dirt causing wear or corrosion from a lack of proper additive.

Best way to buy in Sioux Falls

I keep a healthy supply at my shop at Exit 73 and also at Stan Houston’s on W. 12th St.

The best way to buy is get one 16 oz. bottle and the half gallon as the refill. The savings with the half-gallon is like buying four 160-ounce bottles but paying for three. A sight window is on all bottles assisting with the proper dosage.  And the best part is one ounce (1OZ) treats five gallons! It’s a great bargain even at full retail.

Of course you can buy through our website – AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean Product Code ADF.

We also have 5-gallon sizes for OTR Trucking operations and a small 8 ounce bottle (Case of 6) for passenger car diesels.

 

 

Saber Pro to help with Sioux Falls Tornado Clean-up

Saber Pro 2-cycle oil for chain saws in Sioux Falls

We are fully stocked with the best 2-cycle oil on the planet.

This product will help greatly with the clean up after the tornado damage in Sioux Falls. Chain saws NEED Saber. Don’t struggle with other products.

The Saber Pro we have posted several study’s and articles as it’s AMSOIL’s 2nd oldest product and the one that saves you money.

It’s like insurance for your chainsaw whether you have an expensive one or you have to make an old 2nd hand unit last. You can save on spark-plugs, fuel and downtime with our best 2-strike pre-mix ever created.

Saber Pro 2-cycle oil for chain saws in Sioux Falls

I have it in stock here at the AMSOIL store Tea Exit 73 and also at Stan Houston’s.
We did run out of the Bar & Chain oil today but more has been ordered for both locations.

500,000 Mile Toyota Work Truck

500,000 mile Toyota

Toyota ‘Workhorse’ Clocks More Than 500,000 Miles

Fraser is a satisfied long-term PC who uses AMSOIL lubricants in all of his vehicles and equipment.

Preferred Customer Brock Fraser of Las Vegas counts on his 1998 Toyota Tacoma to keep his business on the road.

“This is a pickup I use primarily for work,” Fraser said. “I own a commercial printing and mailing operation. Frequently, I make runs to Phoenix and Los Angeles (600-mile round-trip runs each) to pick up loads of printed material to bring back to customers in Las Vegas.”

The truck, with its six-cylinder engine, and five-speed tranny, is a workhorse that consistently hauls heavy loads through hilly territory, he said. It had 70,000 miles on the engine when he bought it in late 2005. The odometer recently turned over to 508,000 miles.

Fraser first learned about the qualities of AMSOIL lubricants from a chemist friend. “(He) did a bunch of research and was telling me how highly he thought of AMSOIL,” Fraser said. “That is all it took for me to become a fan. That had to be a good 15 years ago.”

Followed AMSOIL’s published interval recommendation to a T!

Fraser installed AMSOIL Signature Series Motor Oil when he first bought the truck.

“I have always maintained oil change intervals of 25,000 miles with filter changes at 8,300 miles and 16,700 miles using EA15K51 filters,” Fraser said.

Every 100,000 miles he services the transmission and differentials with AMSOIL 80W-90 Synthetic Gear Lube. “The transmission has never been opened up and performs flawlessly,” Fraser said. “This engine has never been opened up. The heads are bolted in place as they came from the factory. The bottom pan has never been removed. She passes smog every year without fail and uses very little oil between changes.”

He is a satisfied Preferred Customer, he said, and now installs AMSOIL products in his lawn mower, his ‘86 Mercedes Benz 560 SL and his 2002 Toyota 4Runner.

Products Fraser Uses

Fraser keeps his truck on the road using the following AMOSIL products:

AMSOIL Signature Series

  • Protects Against Engine Wear
  • Protects Pistons from Low-Speed Pre-Ignition
  • Extends Drains: Protection Guaranteed
EA Filters

  • Absolute Efficiency
  • Less Restriction
  • Contaminant Retention
Synthetic Gear Lube

  • High-load gear and bearing protection
  • Long oil and equipment life
  • Helps reduce maintenance costs
  • Compatible with conventional and synthetic gear lubes
  • Multi-functional for multiple applications – Works in GL4 and GL5 applications
  • Competitive price

Buy Local in Sioux Falls

Find the best lubricants available in Sioux Falls at Stan Houston’s Equipment Company 3020 W 12th St, Sioux Falls, SD 57104

Lawnmower Won’t Start? Do this.

deposits and varnish in carburetor bowl

Lawnmower Won’t Start? Do this.

A lawnmower that won’t start, especially when taken from storage, is almost always due to one problem: bad gas.

Storing a lawnmower in the fall without adding gasoline stabilizer to the fuel tank can cause the fuel to break down and plug the fuel passages. If fixing that problem doesn’t help, there are a few other common maintenance practices to try, as we explain below.

Here’s what to do when your lawnmower won’t start

Replace the gas

Over time (like the six months your lawnmower sat in your garage over the winter), the lighter hydrocarbons in gas can evaporate. This process creates gums and varnish that dirty the carburetor, plug fuel passages and prevent gas from flowing into the combustion chamber.

The carburetor bowl below formed corrosion and deposits during storage, which can easily plug fuel passages and prevent the engine from starting.

Deposits and residue in carburetor bowl

Deposits and residue in carburetor bowl

Ethanol-containing gas can absorb water from the atmosphere, which can lead to phase separation, which occurs when ethanol and gas separate, much like oil and water. Ethanol that has absorbed enough moisture and has sat long enough can foul the fuel system and prevent the engine from starting.

No matter how many times you yank the starter cord and pollute the air with your advanced vocabulary, the lawnmower won’t start if it isn’t getting gas.

In extreme cases, evaporation of lighter hydrocarbons can change the gasoline’s composition enough to prevent it from igniting. The gas may be fueling the engine, but it doesn’t matter if it won’t ignite.

If you neglected to add gasoline stabilizer to the fuel prior to storage, empty the tank and replace with fresh gas. If the tank is nearly empty, simply topping off with fresh gas is often enough to get it started.

On some mowers, you can easily remove and empty the fuel tank. Sometimes that’s more trouble than it’s worth. In these cases, use a fluid extraction pump or even a turkey baster. (We keep them in the Sioux Falls location also)

Clean the carburetor

You’ve replaced the fuel, but your lawnmower still won’t start.

Next, try cleaning the carburetor. Remove the air filter and spray carburetor cleaner into the intake. Let it sit for several minutes to help loosen and dissolve varnish and gums.

On some carburetors, you can easily remove the float bowl. If equipped, first remove the small drain plug and drain the gas from the bowl. Remove the float bowl cover and spray the float and narrow fuel passages with carburetor cleaner.

This kind of “quick-and-dirty” carburetor cleaning is usually all it takes to get the gas flowing again and your lawnmower back to cutting grass.

If not, consider removing the carburetor from the engine, disassembling it and giving it a good cleaning. Be forewarned, however: taking apart a carburetor can lead to nothing but frustration for the uninitiated. Take pictures with your phone to aid in reassembly. Note the positions of any linkages or the settings of any mixture screws, if equipped.

If you’re at all reluctant, visit the servicing dealer instead. Also consider replacing the carburetor altogether. It’s a fairly simple process on most smaller mowers and it’s often less expensive than taking it to the dealer.

Clean/replace the air filter

With the air filter removed, now’s the perfect time to clean it. Tap rigid filters on a workbench or the palm of your hand to dislodge grass clippings, leaves and other debris. Direct compressed air from the inside of the filter out to avoid lodging debris deeper into the media.

Use soap and water to wash foam filters. If it’s been a few years, simply replace the filter; they’re inexpensive and mark the only line of defense against wear-causing debris entering your engine and wearing the cylinder and piston rings.

Check the spark plug

A dirty or bad spark plug may also be to blame. Remove the plug and inspect condition. A spark plug in a properly running four-stroke engine should last for years and never appear oily or burned. If so, replace it.

Use a spark-plug tester to check for spark. If you don’t have one, clip the spark-plug boot onto the plug, hold the plug against the metal cylinder head and slowly pull the starter cord. You should see a strong, blue spark. It helps to test the plug in a darkened garage. Replace the plug if you don’t see a spark or it appears weak.

While you’re at it, check the spark-plug gap and set it to the factory specifications noted in the lawnmower owner’s manual.

If you know the plug is good, but you still don’t have spark, the coil likely has failed and requires replacement.

Did you hit a rock or other obstacle?

We’ve all killed a lawnmower engine after hitting a rock or big tree root.

If your lawnmower won’t start in this scenario, you probably sheared the flywheel key. It’s a tiny piece of metal that aligns the flywheel correctly to set the proper engine timing. Hitting an immovable obstacle can immediately stop the mower blade (and crankshaft) while the flywheel keeps spinning, shearing the key.

In this case, the engine timing is off and the mower won’t start until you pull the flywheel and replace the key. It’s an easy enough job IF you have a set of gear pullers lying around the garage. If not, rent a set from a parts store (or buy one…there’s never a bad reason to buy a new tool) or visit the dealer.

My lawnmower starts, but runs poorly

If you finally get the lawnmower started, but it runs like a three-legged dog, try cleaning the carburetor with AMSOIL Power Foam. It’s a potent cleaning agent designed to remove performance-robbing carbon, varnish and other gunk from carburetors and engines.

Power Foam®

Buy AMSOIL Power Foam

Add gasoline stabilizer to avoid most of these problems

Which sounds better? Completing all these steps each year when your lawnmower won’t start? Or pouring a little gasoline stabilizer into your fuel tank?

Simply using a good gasoline stabilizer can help avoid most of the problems with a lawnmower that won’t start. AMSOIL Gasoline Stabilizer, for example, keeps fuel fresh up to 12 months. It helps prevent the lighter hydrocarbons from evaporating to reduce gum and varnish and keep the fuel flowing. It also contains corrosion inhibitors for additional protection.

Gasoline Stabilizer

Buy AMSOIL Gasoline Stabilizer

I have a five-gallon gas can in my garage from which I fuel two lawnmowers, two chainsaws, two snowblowers, a string trimmer, an ATV and the occasional brush fire. I treat the fuel with Gasoline Stabilizer every time I fill it so I never have to worry about the gas going bad and causing problems.

You can also use AMSOIL Quickshot. It’s designed primarily to clean carburetors and combustion chambers while addressing problems with ethanol. But it also provides short-term gasoline stabilization of up to six months.

Top 5 Mods for Your Turbo Subaru

Subaru tuning

Top 5 Mods for Your Turbo Subaru

So you’re now a part of the worldwide Subaru Community. You wave to other WRX and turbocharged Subaru owners on the road. And you can’t wait to start modifying your car.


But where should you start?

There’s an endless amount of aftermarket support for these cars, so choosing what mods to perform can be tough if you’re new to the Subaru platform. After owning five Subarus in my life (two Legacy GTs, two STIs and one Bugeye WRX), here are my top five mods for your turbo Subaru (WRX, STI, Legacy GT and Forester & Outback XT).

1. Tune, tune, tune!

A proper tune specific to your car, engine and modifications is essential to the health and performance of your Subaru. If you are new to the game, you have to know these cars need to be tuned for just about every modification you make to the engine. If the modification alters the way the engine uses air or fuel, plan on having the car tuned. A good route to go on is to choose all the modifications you want, do them all at once and then have the car tuned. That way you don’t have to go in for a re-tune after adding another piece to your puzzle.

Always go to a reputable tuner! Having your cousin Tim tune your car on his laptop for the first time is a recipe for disaster.

2. Upgrade the Exhaust

It’s time to unleash the Subie rumble!

Increasing airflow through the exhaust with a new downpipe and catback will give it that little pep in its step you want. There are plenty of brands and styles to choose from that all create a unique sound. Bellmouth versus divorced downpipes is a whole other discussion, but for the most part you won’t notice the difference. Look up different combos on YouTube to try and find the sound you like. Note that going completely cat-less could lead to over-boost, and no one wants that. I like to find used pieces from other members of the Subaru community to save money.

Don’t forget – you get what you pay for. And be mindful of your state-specific emissions regulations.

3. Wheels and Tires

Now that your car is tuned properly and sounds great, it’s time to start looking the part.

Check the Internet for different wheel and tire combos you like for your car. There are plenty of wheel threads on forums like Nasioc.com or iwsti.com that offer examples of styles and sizes to help you pick. Familiarize yourself with proper wheel size and fitment and find the right width and offset that fits the style you’re looking for, whether you want a super-functional look or you’re a stance driver who has a sick vape rig.

Again, sourcing a set of used wheels and tires can save you a big chunk of change. Oh, and please don’t refer to “wheels” as “rims.” Wheels are wheels, tires are tires and rims are technically the outer part of the wheel, unless you have 24? chrome wheels from Xzibit.

4. Modify the Suspension

Yes, this is a pretty generic mod. But specifically I’m referring to coilovers, a spring-and-strut combo or bags, if you’re a baller. You can’t have sweet-looking wheels, yet drive around with a huge fender gap, like a monster truck. We Subie owners will not allow it.

If your budget is low, look at a quality lowering spring, but know that you WILL need new struts eventually if you continue to use the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) struts. If you have more money to spend, investing in a good set of coilovers is always a great option. There are great coils out there for around $1,000, and I think they’re worth every penny. Your car will look, ride and perform great – everything you ever wanted!

Now, if you’re a baller and have at least $3,000 to drop on suspension, air bags are pretty slick, too. Ride on a cushion of air and then drop it like it’s hot with the push of a button. Several people have proven they perform just as well as coilovers, too.

5. Air Oil Separator – Catch Can

What is an air oil separator (AOS)? Well, it works just like it sounds – it separates the oil from the air entering your engine to cut down on oil consumption and help eliminate detonation. Basically, like your air filter cleans debris from the air, an air oil separator cleans oil from the air.

Why is this important? In the Boxer Subaru engines, high g-forces push oil to the end of the piston, making Subarus more prone to burn oil. Burning oil can cause detonation, which leads to blown piston ring lands and a hefty repair bill. An AOS decreases blow-by (oil sneaking through the turbo) and helps eliminate oil entering the engine. Think of it like an insurance policy for your Boxer engine.

Everyone has their own version of this Top 5 list. It’s your car, so do what you want. Remember that you get what you pay for. And research before you buy – there’s plenty of information on the forums.

Sioux Falls’s AMSOIL gets a LOT of subaru owners not just for our oil but for the oil filter. The stock one you can crush with your hand. Our nanofiber one has three times the capacity in the same can.

We also have those ball caps with the flat bill so you can fit better with the Subaru groups here.