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Most „electrified“ vehicles still use motor oil

Most „electrified“ vehicles still use motor oil

Most „electrified“ vehicles still use motor oil

The auto industry is changing, but not the Dealer opportunity.

Amsoil Tech Guru

Matt Erickson | DIRECTOR, TECHNICAL PRODUCT MANAGEMENT

Does do term „electrification“ make you fear for the future of the internal combustion engine and your Dealership?

As we explained in the April 2018 AMSOIL Magazine and again at the 45th Anniversary Convention last summer, it shouldn’t.

The truth about vehicle electrification is far different than some headlines lead you to believe. Let’s use Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA)* as an example. FCA grabbed headlines last summer when it pledged $10,5 billion to electrifying its vehicle lineup, including Jeep* and RAM*. The story made news for a couple reasons. 1) Judging by the glut of headlines in my inbox, media outlets love any story about vehicle electrification and 2) FCA is considered a laggard on vehicle electrification compared to its competitors. Its announcement signals that even the holdouts have acknowledged that the future of the auto industry includes electrification.

Constantly seeing stories in your newsfeed about automakers pouring money into electrification can understandably make you nervous. Who’s going to buy the products you sell?

But you can relax. If there is one point you take from this column, make it this:

„Electric“ and „Electrified“are Vastly  Different

Notice that FCA (and other automakers) are moving toward electrification, which simply refers to vehicles that have an electric motor somewhere in the drivetrain. This includes several different hybrid vehicles, including the following:

  • Micro hybrid – Vehicles with stop-start technology, like the Ford* F-150*
  • Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicle (MHEV) – The electric motor cannot propel the vehicle alone; it’s mainly used for engine start, regenerative braking and acceleration assist.
  • Full Hybrid Electric Vehicle (FHEV) – The electric motor alone can propel the vehicle, but has a limited range. See the Toyota* Prius*.
  • Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) – Same as a FHEV, but adds a second way of charging the battery. Uses an engine due to limited electric-motor range. See the Ford C-MAX Energi*.

All four of these hybrid vehicle types use an internal combustion engine and require motor oil.

Here’s where the confusion arises: the following electric vehicles are also included under the broad category of „electrified“ vehicles:

  • Range Extender Electric Vehicle (REEV) – A battery electric vehicle that includes an internal combustion engine-driven generator to charge the batteries. See the Chevy* Volt*.
  • Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) – Propelled only by battery-powered electric motors, like the Nissan* Leaf*.
  • Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) – Uses an electric motor, but stores energy in a hydrogen tank instead of batteries. See the Honda* Clarity*.

Although common sense suggests that a Nissan Leaf is drastically different than a pickup truck whose engine shuts off at stoplights, the auto industry says otherwise. So, when an automaker announces its plans to introduce electrified vehicles, many people falsely assume they’re referring only to electric vehicles that don’t use an internal combustion engine. Some media outlets contribute to the confusion by interchanging „electrified“ and “electric.” The fact is, however, the push toward electrification includes widespread use of drivetrain systems that still use a conventional engine. Take, for example, the 2019 RAM pickup with eTorque and a 48-volt mild hybrid system. The system replaces the engine’s alternator with a belt-driven motor/generator that contributes torque, smooths shifts and recovers energy, where it’s stored in a lithium-ion battery. This application of electrification increases fuel economy about 2-3 mpg for the 3,6L engine;  the 5,7L Hemi engine and its classic rumble still remain available.

Yes, electrification is here – and it will only grow in the ensuing years. But it’s not as scary as the headlines may have you believe. Most vehicles will still require motor oil and other lubricants. In fact, an estimated 92 percent of vehicles on the road worldwide in 2030 will still use an internal combustion engine. These new drivetrain technologies will present challenges to lubricants best addressed by high performance synthetics; the lubricant market is headed our way.

Signature Series Motor Oil Protects Engines From Low-Speed Pre-Ignition

LSPI

SIGNATURE SERIES Protects Engines from Future Industry Problem

LSPI can destroy pistons and connecting rods, bringing an engine to a standstill in seconds. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like General Motors (GM)* have addressed the issue by designing tests to gauge a motor oil’s ability to prevent these destructive events. Signature Series achieved 100 percent protection against LSPI1 in the industry-standard test.

OEMs have been aggressively downsizing engines to meet strict fuel economy and emissions standards while improving power and torque. Most new engines today use some combination of turbochargers, direct-fuel injection and variable valve timing to make more power than their larger counterparts while delivering improved fuel economy.

This scenario seems like all upside for drivers. But today’s smaller, hotter-running engines pose significant challenges to lubricants. The latest is a phenomenon called low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI), also known as “super knock,” which can destroy pistons and connecting rods.

What Is LSPI?

LSPI is another version of engine knock, which has been around since engines were invented. In this case, it occurs under low-speed, high-torque conditions in turbocharged gasoline direct-injected engines – like when you’re taking off from a stoplight. LSPI is the spontaneous ignition of the fuel/air mixture prior to spark-triggered ignition. This form of pre-ignition is more destructive than typical engine knock.

No Magic Bullet

Just as your engine relies on a balanced network of components to function, the motor oil needed to protect it requires additives with the right qualities at the right quantities. While adding more of one ingredient or reducing another seems simple enough, small composition changes can have big impacts. We were determined to find a solution to the LSPI problem without sacrificing the performance of Signature Series in any way.

GM LSPI Test

OEMs like GM have addressed the issue by designing tests to determine a motor oil’s ability to prevent LSPI. The GM LSPI Test records the number of peak pressure events during high-load operation in a turbocharged engine over a five-hour period. Passing the test is required to meet the GM dexos1® Gen 2 specification.

Perfect Score

We armed Signature Series with an advanced detergent system that protects against harmful deposits and LSPI. Signature Series Motor Oil achieved 100 percent protection against LSPI in the engine test required by the GM dexos1 Gen 2 specifications – zero occurrences were recorded throughout five consecutive tests.

API SN PLUS Specifications

API SN PLUS is a recently released specification that was requested by the automobile industry to protect passenger vehicles from LSPI. AMSOIL anticipated this change, and the current formulations of Signature Series, XL and OE synthetic motor oil all meet or exceed the specification. Look for updated product labels featuring the new API “donut” in the near future.

Your customers can be confident that AMSOIL synthetic motor oils protect their modern engines against LSPI, helping their vehicles deliver years of reliable service. For more information on the dangers of LSPI, visit www.amsoil.com/lspi.

 

Example of piston damage due to an LSPI event observed during the testing of a competitor’s motor oil. The red arrows indicate sections of the ring land that have broken away from the piston.

Achieved 100% Protection Against LSPI1

Squeezing out every MPG – Federal Mogul’s Chief Explains the Future

Squeezing out every MPG – Federal Mogul’s Chief Explains the Future

Federal Mogul’s Explains Technology Will Rest on Engine Oil Quality

AMSOIL position with suppliers and technology forms allows it to get these advanced products out first, keeping ahead of the trends.  Other companies may take months or years before stock holders will allow for decreased profits over top tier additive technology.

This is why AMSOIL has the top reputation when it comes to protection and all out performance to true enthusiasts and those who push their vehicles to the max.

See what Federal Mogul’s Chief Technology Officer, Gian Maria Olivetti has to say in this very well detailed and interesting article.

j-a: How much impact do regional and global differences in fuel quality have on the engineering choices you make? 

GMO: There is still a difference, mainly related to the sulphur content, but it’s a bit more harmonised. You can find 10 PPM everywhere. In Eastern Europe, it’s still a little bit an issue. In China, it’s improving, but it’s still different.

The main issue we have now is the quality of the lubricant. The new generation of engines are going in the direction of very sophisticated low viscosity oils. We are talking about 5W30 to 0W20 and 0W10 and beyond to reduce the friction. That means that you have to put wear improver additives in the oil. Also, you have to have low ash oils that are compliant with aftertreatments.

Oil is becoming sophisticated, and to have sophisticated oil around the world is becoming much more difficult than having good fuel. Availability of quality oil is crucial for reliability.

See entire article here

Signature Series: Team Hybrid Masters the Art of Tuner Domination

Signature Series: Team Hybrid Masters the Art of Tuner Domination

 

Over the course of Team Hybrid’s 22+ years in existence, President James Lin and his team have built an empire that shows no signs of stopping. Based on a foundation of passion, loyalty and a serious knack for building first-class vehicles, Team Hybrid is still turning heads and sweeping awardseverywhere they go.

Most recently they landed another feature in the July #182 issue of DSPORT Magazinewith the following sentiment: “After a strong showing at the 2016 season closer with thirteen earned trophies, Team Hybrid came back to collect again. Crew members earned awards in numerous categories including Domestic, KDM, Mazda, Nissan/Infiniti, Toyota/Lexus/Scion, VIP and even People’s Choice. Given its strong presence of head turners and award winners, Team Hybrid took the title of Best Crew.”

Highlights like these are becoming pretty standard fare for Team Hybrid, but Lin and his team remain humble and in constant work mode to be the best without resting on their laurels (of which there are many). Check out the latest installment in the AMSOIL Signature Series to see why Team Hybrid remains an example of leadership and innovation amongst strongly competitive proving grounds. Sioux Falls drivers are finally able to get the best oils for their cars!!