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Amsoil Diesel Fuel Additives Best Choice For Increased Fuel Lubricity

Amsoil Diesel Fuel Additives Best Choice For Increased Fuel Lubricity

Our Diesel Fuel Additives Will Save Your Fuel System and Add Performance

Diesel fuel additives are the most overlooked motor maintenance item next to motor oil. An essential product that must be added to every tank. Many diesel drivers mistakenly think a fuel lubricant is okay every other tank.

New diesel owners are not being told this critical information from the dealership. 

Adequate diesel fuel lubricity is essential for protecting the highly engineered components in modern diesel engines, particularly high-pressure common-rail (HPCR) engines, which are subject to increased wear and deposits that interfere with an optimum spray pattern, reducing power and fuel economy. Many diesel owners add two-stroke oil to their fuel for added lubricity. AMSOIL delivers a better solution that provides additional benefits.

Amsoils diesel fuel additive selection

ULSD Provides Less Lubricity

Diesel fuel has traditionally had high lubrication properties, but the desulfurization process that allows fuel to meet modern ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) requirements also strips it of organic compounds responsible for lubrication. Although the ASTM D975 standard for diesel fuel provides a minimum level of lubricity, it’s not as much as the Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA) has called for.

To meet government mandates for reduced emissions, nearly all diesel fuel sold in North America is ULSD, which contains a maximum of just 15 ppm sulfur, compared to traditional diesel fuel that contained up to 5,000 ppm prior to EPA regulations taking effect in 2006. ULSD is also compatible with modern exhaust treatment devices, such as diesel particulate filters (DPF), that also help reduce emissions.

The Two Stroke Oil Remedy

Because lost fuel lubricity and the expenses associated with fuel-pump and injector replacements are serious concerns among diesel enthusiasts, some have adopted the practice of adding a little two stroke or 2 cycle oil to the fuel to replenish the lost lubricating properties. While this is generally a safe practice, it’s not recommended. Because all two-stroke oils are different, it’s a guessing game regarding how much oil is required to achieve a lubricity benefit. Using too little may not provide any benefit, while using too much may violate EPA laws regarding ash content.

The Superior Remedy: AMSOIL Diesel Fuel Additives

The best way to increase fuel lubricity is to use a fuel additive designed specifically for this purpose, like AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean (ADF – Our best seller), Diesel All-In-One or Diesel Injector Clean + Cetane Boost. These additives also provide specific additional benefits designed to keep diesel engines operating at top performance. Some say they can hear the difference. Omaha is starting to discover the AMSOIL difference now! We are keeping more and more cases so buy your months supply. We keep loads in inventory.

Lubricity Test

The ASTM D6079 High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) lubricity test simulates wear in high-shear conditions, measuring fuel lubricity by rubbing a steel ball on a plate in a bath of fuel and measuring the wear scar. Independent testing reveals Diesel Injector Clean provides superior fuel lubricity over untreated fuel and fuel treated with two-stroke oil.

  • Better lubricity
  • Clean fuel system
  • Avoid EPA violations

August 2019 amsoil dealer magazine

We have plenty of supply here in Sioux Falls. Stan Houston’s and at our Tea Exit location by Marlins.

Ultra-low-sulfur diesel doesn’t provide sufficient lubricity

Ultra-low-sulfur diesel lacks Needed Lubricity

Mark Nyholm | TECHNICAL MANAGER, HEAVY DUTY AND MECHANICAL R&D

Fortunately, we have a simple solution.

It feels like forever ago, but it’s only been 13 years since the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated reduced sulfur content in diesel fuel, in 2006. Boy, were people angry. They knew sulfur helped protect their fuel pump and injectors from failure. Change is scary, and the thought of replacing expensive components even more so.

Fast-forward to 2019, and I rarely hear anyone talking about this. But the problem is even more prevalent now than it was then. Modern diesels demand even more from the fuel pump and injectors than before, increasing the potential for failure. So, why aren’t people still up in arms? My hunch is they have accepted the new reality. Or, they just don’t know what they don’t know when they buy a new truck today.

Today’s ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) provides significantly reduced lubricity – a critical property in controlling fuel-pump and injector wear. While diesel fuel has traditionally had high lubrication properties, the desulfurization process used to strip the diesel fuel of the sulfur content to meet ULSD requirements also strips the fuel of some of its organic compounds responsible for lubrication. The ASTM D975 diesel-fuel standard mandates a minimum lubricity level. However, the Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA) wants the standard to provide for increased lubricity, but lost out on the control of the specification. While the EMA claims there’s a problem, it doesn’t carry enough clout to change the specification.

Since 2006, ULSD has accounted for nearly all diesel available in North America because the EPA mandated reduced sulfur to curb harmful emissions. ULSD now contains a maximum of just 15 ppm sulfur, compared to fuel that had up to 5,000 ppm sulfur prior to EPA regulations.

Waxes in diesel fuel lubricate the fuel pump and injectors, helping fight wear. Without them, the highly engineered components in modern diesels, particularly high-pressure common rail (HPCR) engines, can wear out and cost thousands in repairs. They can also develop deposits that interfere with an optimum spray pattern, reducing power and fuel economy. The editors of Diesel Power Magazine covered the problem of ULSD in the April and May 2019 issues. As reported, the Bosch* CP4.2 fuel pump that comes stock on 2011-2016 Duramax* engines has led to thousands of catastrophic failures. It’s culminated in class-action lawsuits in Texas and California against Bosch, GM*, Ford* and other vehicle manufacturers on behalf of individual diesel owners whose vehicles use that pump. When the CP4.2 fuel pump fails, it instantly contaminates the entire fuel system with metal particulates, costing $8,000 to $12,000 in repairs. The magazine reiterates what AMSOIL has been saying for years: “The way to be proactive in protecting a CP4.2 equipped diesel from an early demise is being diligent about using fuel additives that add lubricity with every fill-up.”

 

The CP4.2 pump is said to fail because of two reasons: 1) It’s designed with about 20 percent reduced flow volume than the previous generation pump, requiring it to work even harder. 2) ULSD isn’t providing enough lubricity.

Our testing of base fuels across the U.S. confirms the second point. ASTM D975 requires diesel fuel to limit the wear scar in lubricity testing to 520 microns. The EMA, meanwhile, sets its own, stricter requirement of 460 microns. As the chart shows, many of the fuels (blue bars) failed to limit wear to 520 microns. And none of them met the EMA’s 460-micron limit.

Fuel treated with AMSOIL Diesel All In-One (ADB) performed far better (red bars). It not only met the ASTM D975 standard, it also met the stricter EMA lubricity requirement. You can find the same technology in Diesel Injector Clean (ADF) and Diesel Injector Clean + Cetane Boost (ADS). Our diesel additives deliver a healthy boost in lubricity to help lubricate diesel fuel pumps and injectors. The extra lubrication helps prevent wear in fuel pumps and injectors. I strongly recommend that all diesel owners use AMSOIL diesel fuel additives with every tank of fuel.

We keep this in large supply in Sioux Falls – Both our Stan Houston’s location and the Tea Exit location (exit 73). Buy in the half gallons to save money.

The Cost of Owning a Diesel – This Product is Not an Option

Diesel Fuel Injector Clean

Diesel Fuel Additives – Not an Option in Diesel Ownership

Years of reviewing the effects of modern diesel fuel, mechanical issues, costs and designs of injectors, pumps, failures keeps the topic of the misunderstood fuel additive fresh in mind.

Impressive In The Field

As an AMSOIL dealer, one product I rank in the top three where overly positive feedback is almost always given at each sale is our Diesel Injector Clean (and lubricant).  Of course many of those sales were started because I suggested to the customer to try our brand over whatever else they were using. And the majority of the time the customer was not using any at all! But the results seem to be instant thus the higher level of feedback.

Diesel Fuel Additives at Stan Houston's

Display at Stan Houston’s on 12th st – Diesel Fuel Additives and synthetic oils.

What To Expect

I could list all the sales info, product points to know, etc. but you can easily find all that in the product listing or technical data sheet (printable PDF). I wanted to state some of the instant feedback and some savings you can expect!

  • Increased mileage beyond any averages AMSOIL claims. I hear 2 to 3 more MPG’s although that’s not advertised.
  • Quieter engine
  • Regens cut in half – That alone is worth it! Unique to AMSOIL’s formula.
  • More power under load – You’ll notice more with the Cetane Boost
  • Solved sluggishness when passing
  • Skip past expected injector failure mileage to next to none
  • RV’s – amazingly easier starts on seldom used engines
  • Longer fuel filter performance
  • Less water buildup in tank

Lubricity

This is the reason it’s not optional. Not AMSOIL but the industry says you need a lubricant added to every tank of fuel.
AMSOIL recently posted about folks using 2-stroke oil in the fuel. They admitted it worked but only offers a fraction of the lubricant needed especially in modern injectors which rely on products with years of development. The results can be in the thousands saved on repair or replacement costs.

A fuel additive supplier who visited at one of our AMSOIL dealer conventions made it clear. He used a 2015 Chevy Durmax diesel for example. He said in 10 year ownership you will ether spend on average $750 on fuel additives or $6000 to $10,000 in injector repair.

Much of the failure is because the fuel or the over the counter additive doesn’t address corrosion within the injector. The wear resulting which is not visible without a microscope can be devastating to your engines efficiency. The injectors these days usually only have 1 to 2 microns of space around them so you cannot afford even the slightest  dirt causing wear or corrosion from a lack of proper additive.

Best way to buy in Sioux Falls

I keep a healthy supply at my shop at Exit 73 and also at Stan Houston’s on W. 12th St.

The best way to buy is get one 16 oz. bottle and the half gallon as the refill. The savings with the half-gallon is like buying four 160-ounce bottles but paying for three. A sight window is on all bottles assisting with the proper dosage.  And the best part is one ounce (1OZ) treats five gallons! It’s a great bargain even at full retail.

Of course you can buy through our website – AMSOIL Diesel Injector Clean Product Code ADF.

We also have 5-gallon sizes for OTR Trucking operations and a small 8 ounce bottle (Case of 6) for passenger car diesels.

 

 

AMSOIL Quickshot® Offers a Simple Solution to Ethanol Problems

Phase separation

AMSOIL Quickshot® Offers a Simple Solution to Ethanol Problems

One of our best sellers here in Sioux Falls.  Keep it for your garage fuel tanks. Fights varnish, attacks deposits and stabilizes fuel in addition to the ethanol problem. Award winning product that  – yes – ACTUALLY WORKS!

Fuel maintenance is a big issue, whether you own a motorcycle, dirt bike, boat, lawnmower or other piece of equipment. Currently, most gasoline sold in the U.S. contains up to 10 percent ethanol (E10), while gasoline containing up to 15 percent (E15) is now available at stations around the country.

Phase separation is when ethanol/water mixtures fall to the bottom of fuel tanks and containers, leading to potentially damaging lean-burn conditions.

Ethanol can causes problems

Because ethanol has an affinity for water, you need to be aware of the conditions in which you operate your equipment. Powersports and lawn & garden equipment should not be stored in damp or wet environments. When water is allowed to collect in the gas tank, the bond between ethanol and gasoline can break, causing a phenomenon known as phase separation.

The ethanol bonds with the water and sinks to the bottom of the fuel tank, which can create a whole host of problems, including the formation of gums, varnish and other insoluble debris that can plug fuel passages and negatively affect engine performance. When this ethanol/water mixture is pulled into the engine, it creates a lean-burn situation that increases combustion-chamber temperatures and can lead to engine damage. Once this happens there is no easy or inexpensive fix. To avoid these problems, contaminated fuel tanks should be emptied and refilled with fresh fuel.

Prevention is best practice

Alternatively, treat fuel with AMSOIL Quickshot® as a preventative measure to avoid rough-running equipment and other performance issues. Quickshot is designed to keep water dispersed throughout the fuel tank, moving it out as a normal part of operation and decreasing the chance of phase separation.

Not only that, Quickshot helps clean deposits that have formed in fuel systems, injectors and carburetors, while also cleaning piston tops, spark plugs and combustion chambers. It also stabilizes fuel between uses and during short-term storage.

Unlike many competing fuel additives, Quickshot is extremely potent and not diluted. It provides effective cleaning action, making it an all-around great product for powersports and lawn & garden equipment.

Buy Now

Is There Really an Advantage with Premium Gas?

OCTANE EXPLAINED: DOES PREMIUM, HIGH-OCTANE GAS BOOST PERFORMANCE?

Save yourself a lot of money and use the lowest rating suggested in your owners manual. Typically the only cars which need premium fuel are older high compression engines (pre 1980’s) and the ever popular turbocharged engines. I run premium in my Ford Transit with the Ecoboost Turbo as it is required. The added compression demands it to resiste pre-ignition (reducing knock) and I’ve even verified maximum mileage on Cenex 91 even over the OK’d 89, but on typical fuel injection cars over the past 25 years lower octane ratings are no issue at all  – Enjoy the article below…

Sioux Falls drivers – email me your favorite gas stop you get the best performance from and I’ll make a post listing any feedback we get. Thanks!! Email me at ches@syntheticwarehouse.com

A recent AAA report found that American motorists wasted $2.1 billion in the last year buying premium gasoline for engines designed to run on regular gas.

The reasons why are likely due to the following misconceptions about premium gas:

  • Contains higher energy content (increasing power and fuel economy)
  • Formulated with higher-quality additives (increasing engine cleanliness)

What is Premium Gas?

When motorists see premium 91-octane gas at the pump, they may assume it contains higher energy content compared to regular 87-octane gas. After all, “high-octane” is often synonymous with increased power and performance. The 91-octane gas should, they think, provide improved fuel economy and power.

In fact, octane has nothing to do with energy content or quality – it’s a measurement of the gasoline’s ability to resist engine knock. Higher octane denotes greater knock control.

What is Engine Knock?

Octane neededOn an engine’s intake stroke, the piston travels down the cylinder, allowing air/ fuel to fill the available space. Assume the cylinder holds 900cc when the piston is at bottom dead center. The piston then travels up the cylinder, compressing the fuel/air in preparation for combustion. Assume cylinder volume is reduced to 100cc when the piston is at top dead center. The relationship between the two volumes is known as the compression ratio. In this case, 900:100 is reduced to 9:1. The compression ratio indicates cylinder pressure, and more pressure equals more power and greater efficiency. That’s why high-performance cars and heavy-duty diesels typically have higher compression ratios than standard cars or trucks.

While higher compression seems like all up-side, it can invite negative consequences. Compression heats the fuel/air mixture, allowing it to burn more efficiently. If compressed too much, gasoline can ignite too early, causing uncontrolled and early ignition. This leads to a knocking or pinging sound, robs the engine of power and can lead to engine damage. Typically, the engine’s computer will detect engine knock and adjust timing and the air/ fuel ratio accordingly. Although this protects the engine from damage, it can substantially reduce engine performance and efficiency.

Most high-compression gas engines require use of premium gas to better resist engine knock and prevent the computer from detuning the engine to protect against knock-related damage. Using premium gas in a clean, mechanically sound engine not designed to use it, though, provides no benefit.

In engines with carbon buildup on pistons or in the combustion chamber, however, premium gas can provide some benefit. Deposits can reduce cylinder volume at top dead center, effectively increasing the compression ratio. This alone can lead to engine knock. The deposits can also become hot spots that preignite the mixture, leading to engine knock.

In these cases, a higher octane fuel helps resist engine knock and allows the engine to operate closer to its normal conditions rather than detuning to prevent engine knock.

For best performance, use the fuel recommended in your vehicle owner’s manual.

Higher Octane Doesn’t Mean Higher Quality

The other popular misconception is that premium gas contains a higher concentration of cleaning agents and other performance-improving additives.

While many formulators market a highquality premium gasoline, such as Shell* V-Power* Nitro+ or ExxonMobil* Synergy*, the premium gasoline at your local filling station may not be formulated to improve performance in any aspect other than octane rating. Quality can vary from brand to brand and station to station.

This is why we sell AMSOIL P.i.® (API)  for cars and trucks and AMSOIL Quickshot® (AQS) for smaller engines. They provide excellent detergency to help clean dirty injectors and carburetors for maximum fuel economy and operability. Once you understand the truth about premium gas, these additives will better assist in overall performance thus giving better peace of mind and benefits you’re seeking.