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Synthetic Oil Filters vs Regular Oil Filters

nanofiber oil filter 20 micron

Synthetic Oil Filters vs Regular Oil Filters

Early automobile engines didn’t use oil filters, or air filters for that matter. For this reason frequent oil changes were a must. Motor oil quality wasn’t really that important in those days, anyway. It was the discarded by-product of processes designed to create other products from crude oil, like fuel, benzene and other petrochemicals.

The first oil filters were simple, generally consisting of a screen placed at the oil pump intake in order to keep mice, cockroaches and other debris from getting churned inside the pistons. (OK, just checking to see if you’re paying attention.) It was, however, a fairly crude setup.

In 1923, a pair of American inventors, George Greenhalgh and Ernest Sweetland, filed a patent for a new kind of oil filter that they called the Purolator, which became a handle for “pure oil later.” The Purolator oil filter was the first oil filter invented specifically for cars, generating a whole new industry – the oil filtration aftermarket.

To many people, oil filters are a generic product. Price is the only factor considered when they choose a filter. But just as today’s engines have become increasingly sophisticated, so have many of today’s oil filters. They may look much the same on the outside, but what’s inside can make a big difference.

Oil filters are not created equal

A couple weeks ago I shared a lexicon of filter terms.

It’s true that some things are overpriced, like movie theater popcorn, but more often than not the other side of the coin is true: you get what you pay for. That is, quality costs more than going on the cheap. All kinds of sayings come to mind, like “Don’t be penny wise and pound foolish.” Cars cost a pretty penny these days, even used ones if you want something reliable, so I suggest thinking twice before going cheap on maintenance.

An oil filter’s job is to capture contaminants and hold them prisoner.

Let’s start with the filter media

As the oil circulates through the engine, it picks up contaminants. The filter’s assignment is to capture these contaminants and hold them prisoner, so to speak. Some of these contaminants come from the atmosphere, some from wear and some are byproducts of combustion.

The challenge for filter manufacturers is to use filter media that is porous enough to allow good oil flow, but not so impermeable that it blocks flow and causes oil starvation. It’s a big challenge, especially in racing applications, which is why so many manufacturers of auto aftermarket products are involved in racing. Racing pushes product performance to its limits, and manufacturers learn the stress points of engine components, lubricant capabilities and filters, among other things.

The four oil filter families

Filters come in four basic families.

  • Standard oil filters sold at most oil-change facilities
  • High-performance filters
  • Racing filters
  • Synthetic-media filters

AMSOIL Ea® Oil Filters feature advanced full-synthetic media that traps and holds a greater quantity of small, wear-producing contaminants compared to conventional filters. Because AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil is designed for a longer drain interval – 25,000 miles/one year/700 hours (whichever comes first) – we recognized the need to offer filters capable of protecting for an extended service life while reducing wear.

Other areas where there can be a quality difference include the gaskets, the canister itself, the back-plate and the all-important anti-drainback valve. But the media itself is the heart of the filter’s effectiveness, or ineffectiveness. If you do a search and read forums on this topic, you’ll find stories about bunched-up material clogging oil passages and see photos of other horrors leading to a filter’s early demise. At one forum, I saw a photo where the filter looked like it had been twisted in a blender (the canister had been removed to reveal this inner destruction.) More startling, though, was that in the background was a fairly new Cadillac. Why would people go top drawer on a car and low-ball it with the filter?

All that to say that there are some pretty good reasons to choose a quality filter. There are already enough problems in the world. Why worry about your filters doing what they are supposed to do.

Find an AMSOIL Ea Oil Filter for My Vehicle

AAA TESTING AFFIRMS SUPERIORITY OF SYNTHETIC MOTOR OILS

AAA Testing Confirms superiority of synthetics! Now add that to the fact that AMSOIL is the only true synthetic!

AAA AFFIRMS SUPERIORITY OF SYNTHETIC MOTOR OILS

AMSOIL introduced the world to synthetic motor oil in 1972, and we’ve been extolling the benefits ever since. While we’ve been joined by many vehicle and equipment manufacturers and competing motor oil companies over the years, the American Automobile Association (AAA) is the most recent company to promote the benefits of using synthetics. The popular club recently conducted in-depth testing to determine if it’s worth paying more for synthetic oil over conventional oil.

The answer is a resounding “yes.”

“Oil protects critical engine components from damage and AAA found that synthetic engine oils performed an average of 47 percent better than conventional oils in a variety of industry-standard tests,” said John Nielsen, AAA’s managing director of Automotive Engineering and Repair. “With its superior resistance to deterioration, AAA’s findings indicate that synthetic oil is particularly beneficial to newer vehicles with turbo-charged engines and for vehicles that frequently drive in stop-and-go traffic, tow heavy loads or operate in extreme hot or cold conditions.

“It’s understandable that drivers may be skeptical of any service that is nearly twice the cost of the alternative. While a manufacturer-approved conventional oil will not harm a vehicle’s engine, the extra $30 per oil change could actually save money in the long run by protecting critical engine components over time.”

AAA Testing

AAA’s research included eight industrystandard ASTM tests focusing on shear stability, deposit formation, volatility, cold-temperature pumpability, oxidation resistance and oxidation-induced rheological changes. Each test was performed on five synthetic and five conventional oils. The results of this study by a reputable, thirdparty organization reaffirm what we’ve been saying for more than 45 years and give you one more reference point to back up your claims in the buy-sell process.

NOACK Volatility Test

The NOACK Volatility Test (ASTM D5800) determines the evaporation loss of lubricants in high-temperature service. The more motor oils vaporize, the thicker and heavier they become, contributing to poor circulation, reduced fuel economy and increased oil consumption, wear and emissions. The lower the number, the better the resistance to vaporization.

Thermo-Oxidation Engine Oil Simulation Test (TEOST)

The Thermo-Oxidation Engine Oil Simulation Test (ASTM D6335) determines the deposit-resisting properties of lubricants in high-temperature service. Motor oils can form deposits when exposed to increased heat, reducing efficiency and contributing to poor overall performance. The lower the number, the better the resistance to deposit formation.

AAA testing indicates synthetic motor oils more effectively resist hightemperature vaporization and deposit formation, helping maintain peak fuel efficiency and reducing wear, oil consumption and emissions.

Propane Discount Week – $2.57 per Gallon

The convenience of refilling your propane tank saves you money

Fill your Propane Tanks Now!

Propane Special of the year. We won’t do this again till Spring. Tuesday the 14th through Saturday 18th, propane is only $2.57 per gallon!! And if you buy any AMSOIL product when you visit the price goes down to $2.20/gal!

So plan your oil change, clean your fuel systems with AMSOIL gasoline, diesel or small engine additives, and bring your propane tanks this week!

Can a 1943 Jeep Survive This? Check out AMSOIL Expedition Colorado

1943 Jeep adventure

Can a 1943 Jeep Survive This? Check out AMSOIL Expedition Colorado

For brothers Brad and Roger Lovell, adventure is always around the next turn, literally. Brad typically finds adventure behind the wheel of his off-road racing truck on a TORC Series track. Roger finds it during grueling Ultra 4 events. Sometimes the brothers even find adventure together, like when winning the Smittybilt Every Man Challenge during King of the Hammers week.

This summer, the Lovell brothers decided to take a different type of adventure.

Armed only with what they could pack into their three pre-2000 off-road vehicles, the Lovells, their sons, mechanic Jake Arbitter and AMSOIL video producer/photographer Wyatt Gruben scaled rock ledges and drove through heavy downpours to complete the 550-mile trek from Colorado Springs, Colo., to Moab, Utah.

Brad recently sat down with us to answer a few questions about AMSOIL Expedition Colorado.

AMSOIL: What was the purpose of this trip?

Lovell: The purpose of this trip was simply to see if it could be done. We grew up in the Rocky Mountains and, rather than turning around to go home after the weekend, we wanted to see what adventure lay on the other side of the ridge line. By using older vehicles, we wanted the experience of our forefathers and to pass it on to our children. Overall, we were looking to find authentic adventure in our backyard, and we definitely succeeded in that.

AMSOIL: Who went with you?

Lovell: There has been a lot of interest in AMSOIL Expedition Colorado from friends and associates. A lot of people wanted to go, but we needed to keep it simple and small to prove the concept. In the end it was myself and my 11-year-old boys (Adam and Byam), my brother Roger and his son (Parker), plus Jake Arbitter, who works for the team, and Wyatt Gruben to capture some great images.

AMSOIL: Is this the first time you have done this?

Lovell: Yes. The idea came about to see if the West was really still wild. Just like there was a time in history when cattle drives were drowned out by fences, we wanted to see if we could still cross 550 miles of the Rocky Mountains on only dirt trails. The answer? Well, we were thwarted by snow, road construction and large landowners locking gates on what appeared to be private roads. We made it, but with more pavement miles than I had hoped. With this experience, planning and a little luck, we will develop a better route.

AMSOIL: What are the makes/models of the cars that you drove?

Lovell: This is an adventure and we wanted to make it difficult. My brother and I grew up on similar adventures and, in all reality, this was equally a chance to pass the same experiences on to our children. We drove the following:

  • 1943 Willys MB (Brad) – we originally bought this as a pit-support vehicle and my kids took a great interest in rebuilding it. They helped me redo the engine, brakes, wiring, etc. before the trip.
  • 1986 Ford Bronco II (Roger) – this was Roger’s first vehicle when he turned 16. It has been through a half dozen builds over the last 28 years and has solid axles, a 5.0L V-8, linked rear suspension and has been narrowed 6 inches.
  • 1996 Ford Ranger (Jake) þ Jake built this Ranger while attending UNOH [University of Northern Ohio] and it sports solid axles front and rear and a lot of suspension work. It should be noted that this is Jake’s daily driver, and he drove all the way back to Colorado Springs from Moab.

AMSOIL: Where did the expedition start/stop and what is the distance between those two?

Lovell: We started in downtown Colorado Springs in front of the Antlers Hotel. It is a historic hotel located on the zero/zero block of Colorado Springs. We ended the trip overlooking the town of Moab on the Hell’s Revenge Trail. It seemed more fitting than the center of town because everyone goes to Moab for the trails and wilderness, not the town itself. The total distance was 550 miles, which we mapped on Google Earth and tracked during the expedition on an iPad.

AMSOIL: So, why are you wearing a garbage bag?

Ha! We had all kinds of weather on the trip. We were in a thunderstorm above timberline, which is not a good place to be. The head gasket in the Willys had just gone sour and we were all freezing cold. My “breathable” rain gear proved to not be waterproof and I was really cold. The only waterproof thing left was a trash bag. It felt GREAT to get some dry clothes on and stay dry!

To see what products the Lovell’s use, check them out here.

To sign up to see future installments of AMSOIL Signature Series, sign up here.

First Time Heading to Sturgis? We’ve Got Some Tips.

First Time Heading to Sturgis? We’ve Got Some Tips.

First Time Heading to Sturgis? We’ve Got Some Tips.

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is a true bucket-list destination for any motorcycle enthusiast. (Well except for sport or adventure riders)
Each year thousands upon thousands of riders descend on Sturgis, S.D., and turn this small, sleepy town into a motorcycle mecca. Some travel the road to Sturgis as an annual endeavor, while others make it a once-in-a-lifetime journey. In either case, there is always the thrilling experience of hitting the open road to Sturgis. For those taking their inaugural ride to the world-famous Rally the week of Aug. 4-13, we’ve got some ideas to keep in mind that will help make your first rally appearance a success.

Formulate a plan:

It’s easy to become overwhelmed with the sights and sounds of Sturgis. Leaving room for spontaneity is essential, meaning you don’t need a minute-by-minute itinerary. But having some guidelines ensures you are in the right place at the right time, whatever your dining/entertainment/riding needs. Before you leave, check out the various venue schedules to see what they have in store throughout the week and plan accordingly. Have some extra money for the $20 burgers and overpriced beers.

Prepare your bike:

Nothing is worse than a roadside breakdown, whether on Main Street in Sturgis or en route to and from the rally. Before you hit the highway, make sure your bike is roadworthy for the miles ahead. Check your tires for proper inflation and tread; chain/belt condition; brakes; lights and, of course, fluids. A fresh oil change with AMSOIL Synthetic Motor Oil will help your engine deliver peak performance despite the intense heat for which Sturgis is famous.

Pack accordingly:

Sturgis can get hot. Very hot. Bring light-colored clothing that breathes and reflects the sunlight. Long sleeves are a must to prevent windburn, so bring something light and easy to take on and off before and after the ride. Don’t forget sunscreen to keep you protected during the long hours you’ll spend out in the open.

Stay hydrated:

Did we mention Sturgis can get hot? Staying hydrated is key to staying alert and refreshed while clocking miles under the sun. Plan rest stops around gas stations and restock your drinking fluids often.

Be prepared for lots of bikes. And wildlife.

Driving alongside a large pack of bikes takes skill and confidence in your riding abilities. Be aware of your surroundings at all times and practice safe riding habitsto keep yourself and those around you out of harm’s way. Additionally, South Dakota has deer, bison, coyotes, sheep and other animals roaming the frontier and wandering onto roadways. Be alert to their presence and avoid riding at night.

Have Fun $$:

Most importantly, have fun and enjoy making memories at the largest motorcycle rally in the US. Expect to see thousands of enthusiasts who share your passion for riding, and hear a week’s worth of powerful exhaust and bike rumbles from every bike model imaginable. Expect to see AMSOIL, the Official Oil of Sturgis, welcoming riders in the Main Street booth just east of Junction Ave. and conducting oil changes at the locations below. When the 2017 event draws to a close, expect to leave while already making plans for your next trip to the historic Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

AMSOIL Oil Change Locations:

Adam Halstead – Rapid City Exit 55 on I-90 (near HD Rapid City)

Mark Miklos: Mad Dog Custom Cycles – Intersection of Junction Ave & Sherman St (across from HD)