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New AMSOIL Brake Fluid and Brake & Parts

Amsoil Brake Fluid Exceeds Requirements

New AMSOIL Brake Fluid and Brake & Parts

Performance and Reliability

 

New DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid (BFLV), DOMINATOR® DOT 4 Synthetic Racing Brake Fluid (BFR) and Brake & Parts Cleaner (BPC) help boost the performance, safety and reliability of brake systems.

AMSOIL DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid, AMSOIL DOMINATOR DOT 4 Synthetic Racing Brake Fluid and AMSOIL Brake & Parts Cleaner will launch April 3. These new products are precisely tailored to the needs of auto enthusiasts and dedicated racers. DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid meets the highest DOT standards (5.1) and is the perfect choice for high-performance passenger-car, light-truck and powersports applications. DOMINATOR DOT 4 Synthetic Racing Brake Fluid features the ultra-high boiling point required during extreme racing conditions. Brake & Parts Cleaner supplies auto enthusiasts and mechanics with a professional strength, dedicated brake and parts cleaner.

AMSOIL DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake FLuid

  • Maximum ABS and traction-control performance: Low-viscosity, specially designed fluid provides improved cold-weather performance and excellent ABS and traction control responsiveness.
  • Firm brake pedal feel: Maintains low compressibility in severe operating conditions, resulting in consistent brake pedal feel.
  • Helps extend the life of essential components like calipers, wheel cylinders, seals, lines, master cylinders and ABS control valves.

AMSOIL DOMINATOR® DOT 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid

  • Provides vapor lock protection through high boiling points.
  • Resists brake fade common in racing applications for a confident brake feel all the way to the finish line.
  • Nitrogen blanket added to avoid moisture absorption and prevent contamination during manufacturing and storage, ensuring top-quality fluid upon purchase.

Recommendations

AMSOIL DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid is engineered for use in passenger cars and light trucks. It is a DOT 5.1 product, exceeding the specifications of DOT 3 and DOT 4. Additionally, its 5.1 formula provides excellent protection against water contamination. Rather than offer multiple products, we created one formula that performs best in all three applications.

DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid is also the primary recommendation for powersports applications. However, if a customer consistently pushes his or her brakes to the limit in racing (or similar applications), DOMINATOR DOT 4 Synthetic Racing Brake Fluid is recommended.

Refer to the owner’s manual regarding the proper change interval for your brake fluid and to determine the correct DOT classification. Change AMSOIL DOT 3 & 4 Synthetic Brake Fluid twice a year for maximum performance. Change AMSOIL DOMINATOR DOT 4 Synthetic Racing Brake Fluid once a year for maximum performance.

AMSOIL Brake & Parts Cleaner

New Brake & Parts Cleaner is a professional-strength product that quickly and effectively removes oil, grease, brake fluid and other contaminants from brake parts and other automotive components. It cleans brake parts with no major disassembly and leaves no residue, helping eliminate brake squeal and chatter.

  • Quickly removes grease and oil
  • Leaves no residue
  • Dries quickly
  • Chlorinated, non-flammable formula
  • VOC-free

Applications

  • Brake Parts
  • Brake Pads
  • Calipers
  • Drums and More

Brake & Parts Cleaner (BPC) vs. Heavy-Duty Degreaser (ADG)

Brake & Parts Cleaner and Heavy-Duty Degreaser are both excellent cleaning and degreasing products. If working with painted, plastic or rubber surfaces, we recommend choosing Heavy-Duty Degreaser.

What are CAFÉ Standards?

Fuel economy standards

What are CAFÉ Standards?

The energy crisis of the 1970s led to modern CAFE standards.

Back in March, news hit that the Trump administration was considering reevaluating the corporate average fuel economy (CAFÉ) standards that mandate fleet-wide fuel economy of 54.5 mpg by 2025.

Some claim the standards are too strict, will cost jobs and will take money from people’s pockets as vehicles become more expensive. Allegations of the Obama administration engaging in last-minute shenanigans to maintain the standard ensued.

On the flip side, others say that maintaining the current standard will strengthen our energy policy, reduce greenhouse gases and create jobs.

Either way, President Trump decided to re-examine the standard and determine whether or not to scale it back. A decision may not come until April 2018. Allegations of the Trump administration engaging in shenanigans have since ensued.

I’m not getting into any of that.

Instead, what’s the point CAFÉ standards and how did they begin?

Remember the Yom Kippur War of 1973? Me, either. I do, however, recall images of the gas lines of the 1970s. My parents occasionally dust off one of those stories about waiting hours for gas – if there was any – whenever we spoiled brats complain about $2.00/gal. gas.

Well, the U.S. decided to back Israel in the Yom Kippur War, and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) expressed its disdain by shutting off the crude-oil spigot to America. The result? The price of oil quadrupled by March 1974.

Inevitably, the price of gas jumped, too, leading to widespread gas shortages and sticker shock when drivers rolled up to the pump in their massive, gas-chugging V-8s.

Things took another turn for the worse in 1979 after tempers again flared in the Middle East, this time involving Iran and Iraq, which pushed gas to record highs. The average price per gallon hit $2.64 in 1981, higher than today’s price.

By that time, the U.S. government had responded with its first set of CAFÉ standards, enacted in 1975. Each automaker’s auto fleet would have to deliver an average of 18 mpg by 1978 or face penalties. The standard, in theory, would reduce our dependency on foreign oil and mitigate future disruptions to the supply chain.

Take that, OPEC.

Better engines = better fuel economy

The CAFÉ standards have steadily grown more strict over the years. They also include trucks today, and the number is typically reported as the average between an automaker’s cars and light trucks.

Automakers have developed several new technologies to boost average fuel economy.

  • Vehicles today are much lighter than those of yesteryear, with the aluminum-bodied Ford F-150 representing the poster child for modern light-weighting.
  • Fuel injectors replaced the carburetor back the in 1980s, allowing for more precise fuel delivery.
  • Cylinder deactivation has evolved from fascinating space-age marvel to ho-hum technology, helping bigger vehicles squeeze a few more miles out of each gallon.
  • Turbochargers help smaller engines make more power, allowing automakers to use a four-cylinder engine where they once used a V-6.
  • Variable valve timing adjusts when the valves open and close in relation to operating conditions, boosting efficiency.
  • Direct fuel injection takes precision fuel delivery to another level.
  • Synthetic lubricants reduce energy lost to friction, while lower-viscosity lubricants reduce pumping losses. Plus, hybrid and electric vehicles are popping up in most automakers’ fleets to help increase their fleet-wide mpg average.
  • And, of course, most of these advancements wouldn’t be possible without computers now performing thousands of calculations per second as you drive, endlessly searching for the ideal confluence of performance and fuel economy.

And it all started with the Yom Kippur War.

Whatever happens in the latest battle of the CAFÉ standards, you can bet the automakers are going to keep ramping up their engine technology to get the most mpg possible.

Synthetic motor oil was made for strict CAFE standards

Many of these new advancements take a toll on the engine, too, which fellow blogger Josh Kimmes talked about recently. Modern engines run hotter, suffer increased stress and generate more contaminants in the motor oil, all on drain intervals much longer than the old 3,000-mile standby of years gone by. Is there any wonder why many automakers now use synthetic lubricants in their vehicles and recommend them as the service fill?

Upgrade your vehicle to AMSOIL synthetic lubricants to take full advantage of the amazing technology we’re seeing in the market today. They deliver outstanding wear protection and engine cleanliness, while maximizing fuel economy, too.

What good is driving the most advanced engine in the world if you don’t protect it with an oil just as advanced?

Wherever you stand on the issues, we can all agree on that.

Outboard Synthetic 2-Stroke Oil Keeps 1974 Evinrude Running Str

Amsoil performance in Evinrude 2-cycle

Outboard Synthetic 2-Stroke Oil Keeps 1974 Evinrude Running Str

So many variables determine the life expectancy of an outboard motor that it’s hard to predict with any accuracy how long an outboard motor will run.

But almost anyone would agree that a 1974 Evinrude that is still performing well in 2017 is unusual. If you’re the guy who got it for free, you’re thrilled.

Dealer Mark Neibuhr of Sequim, Wash. has a 1974 Evinrude Silver Starflite 135 hp outboard that he still uses. “I acquired this boat around ‘93 or ‘94, (totally stripped and gutted) and was given the outboard, which needed rebuilding,” Neibuhr said.

It was 2001 when he had the boat seaworthy and the Evinrude rebuilt, he said.

He used the boat in Louisiana before he installed AMSOIL products, Neibuhr said. He had installed the AMSOIL 100:1 oil when he was in Wisconsin, where the boat was used almost exclusively for water skiing in Lake Nebagamon, a small lake in the northern part of the state. Since 2012, he’s used the boat for salmon fishing and crabbing in the salt water of Washington’s Puget sound.

“After many years and hundreds of hours of use in Louisiana and Wisconsin, I moved west to Washington in 2012, where I continue using the boat in the salt water,” Neibuhr said. “It’s still going very strong, like-new compression readings and super smooth running and plenty of power still.”

Sometime in 2006 or 2007, Niebuhr started using AMSOIL Outboard Synthetic 2-Stroke Oil. “I immediately noticed a big reduction in smoke, especially at idle speeds …,” he said.

“The engine has never had any problems whatsoever while running AMSOIL 100:1 oil,” Neibuhr said. “I recently had to open up the powerhead due to a water problem. Upon disassembly, I was amazed at the internal condition of the bearings, cylinder liners, piston and rings, and the overall cleanliness of the internal parts. Most impressive was the complete absence of carbon deposits on the piston tops and ring grooves. I was amazed that after almost 10 years of using AMSOIL the engine looked as good as it did when I rebuilt it in 2001.”

Recently, he decided the boat and engine were overdue for painting and restoration.

“I did considerable research into the original colors and marking of the engine as it was in 1974, and the picture is as close as I could get,” Neibuhr said. “The only difference was a small decal that had ‘Silver Starflite’ affixed to the mid section of the outboard. So I improvised and thought the people at AMSOIL would appreciate my ‘creativity.’”

Why are We Tearing Apart this Indian Scout?

Amsoils new test bike - Indian Scout

Why are We Tearing Apart this Indian Scout?

(Plus, Check Out this New Product now in Sioux Falls)

Motorcycles occupy a prominent place in our national lore. The V-twin engine, one can argue, belongs in our menagerie of quintessentially “American” items, right next to the bald eagle, the Liberty Bell and Abe Lincoln’s stovepipe hat.

It’s easy to see why. Motorcycles stand for freedom, rebellion, power. For many Americans (like Guinness World Record holder Danell Lynn), a motorcycle is their weapon of choice to fight the specter of an unlived, ordinary life.

One of the best…

Most opt for a Harley-Davidson, whose engines have provided the soundtrack of the American summer for decades. It’s impossible to drive through just about any paved corner of America and not hear the rumble of a Harley. The brand is so firmly entrenched in our psyche that, for many, “Harley” has become the generic term for “motorcycle,” the way “Coke” stands for any soft drink in the South.

Not bad for a company founded in a little shed in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1903.

…but not the first

But for all Harley’s fame, the company can’t lay claim to being the first American motorcycle company. That distinction goes to Indian, founded just two years earlier, in 1901. Throughout the 1910s, Indian was the largest motorcycle manufacturer in the world. The Indian Scout and Chief gained huge popularity throughout the early 20th Century.

But financial trouble eventually beset the company, and Indian ceased production in 1953. One of America’s definitive brands shuttered its doors.

Flash forward to 2011, when Polaris Industries, better known around here for making snowmobiles, bought the brand and injected into it new life…and money. The Chief is back. So is the Scout, which was unveiled in Sturgis in 2014. Motorcycle.com named the Scout its 2015 Motorcycle of the Year.

Today, with sales of V-twins stagnant industry-wide, the Scout has bucked the trend, thanks to its classic styling and lightweight chassis powered by a 100-hp V-twin.

Let the testing begin

This preamble isn’t meant as a commercial for Indian. It’s meant to add context to this Indian Scout that rolled into our mechanical lab earlier this year.


While one look entices most people to jump aboard and hit the streets, it beckons us to drive right into our dyno cell for a few rounds of testing. In fact, this 2017 Scout is replacing our 2012 Harley-Davidson Street Bob, which has accumulated 207,111 miles over the past few years in all kinds of engine testing.

Why the Indian? For starters, we simply like testing things around here. Our mechanical lab is a who’s who in the world of engine and equipment manufacturers. Adding Indian components to our collection of Harley, GM, Stihl, Honda and other parts seemed to fit the bill.

More importantly, we just introduced new AMSOIL 15W-60 Synthetic V-Twin Motorcycle Oil, and it’s recommended for the Indian Scout (along with Victory motorcycles). We already know the formulation works great in the Scout, but we’re never satisfied with “good enough” around here. This bike gives us our own “proving grounds” in which to test, tweak and re-test our formulations. So, in the months ahead, the Scout’s 1133-cc V-twin will be rumbling away in our mechanical lab under the watchful eyes of our technicians.

Once the tests end, the real fun begins –tearing down the engine and examining the pistons, rings, cylinders and other parts. One of my tasks here at AMSOIL is to assist in documenting some of our testing, so I plan to get awfully familiar with the guts of this Scout in the days ahead.

Hopefully we’ll have some interesting results to share soon, so stay tuned.

Until then, get out and ride.

Upgraded Protection for Indian Scout, Victory Motorcycles

 

New AMSOIL 15W-60 Synthetic V-Twin Motorcycle Oil expands the AMSOIL V-twin motorcycle oil product line. It is recommended for the popular Indian* Scout* and all Victory* motorcycles.

Fights heat and wear

Like the rest of the AMSOIL V-twin line, 15W-60 Synthetic V-Twin Motorcycle Oil is designed to resist extreme heat and deliver excellent wear protection. Summer riding can cause engine temperatures to skyrocket, especially in slow-moving rally or parade traffic. AMSOIL 15W-60 Synthetic V-Twin Motorcycle Oil’s outstanding heat resistance helps bikers ride with confidence in the most extreme conditions.

Why is extreme heat so bad for motorcycles?

High heat causes the pistons to expand, potentially leading to catastrophic scuffing and cylinder wear. It also hastens oil breakdown – the rate of oxidation doubles for every 18°F increase in temperature. Oil that has oxidized leads to performance-robbing deposits.

In V-twins, especially air-cooled models, the oil plays a vital role in carrying away heat and dissipating it into the atmosphere via the oil pan or oil cooler. AMSOIL Synthetic V-Twin Motorcycle Oil withstands intense heat, helping your bike last longer and run better.

Helps ease shifting

Riders also like to use an oil that helps deliver smooth shifts. Here again, AMSOIL 15W-60 Synthetic V-Twin Motorcycle Oil delivers. Its wet-clutch-compatible formulation contains no friction modifiers and promotes smooth shifts, helping riders avoid killing the engine.

Find AMSOIL Products for my Motorcycle

*All trademarked names and images are the property of their respective owners and may be registered marks in some countries. No affiliation or endorsement claim, express or implied, is made by their use. All products advertised here are developed by AMSOIL for use in the applications shown.

Why are There Different Two-Stroke Oil Mix Ratios for Chainsaw Oil

2-cycle mix ratios

Why are There Different Two-Stroke Oil Mix Ratios for Chainsaw Oil

Swamp mix.

That’s what you call a concoction of two-stroke oil and gas that’s been slopped together with no measuring tools and no regard for engine protection. Your chainsaw or string trimmer could be running on a 50:1 mix. Could be 72:1. Could be 147:1. There’s no telling.

I often made swamp mix back in the day. Like other adherents to the dark art of mixing foul-smelling liquids in a dimly lit shed, I did it for a couple reasons: 1) I didn’t have clearly marked measuring containers at the ready, and 2) even if I had, I wouldn’t have felt like playing chemist with my chainsaw when I’d rather be cutting brush.

I never blew up a saw doing this. But, then again, I’m not a professional logger, so I didn’t cut often.

Some people don’t like mixing two-stroke fuel/oil because it’s a mess. Some hate it because math makes their brain hurt.

What is a two-stroke mix ratio?

The math isn’t that tough to understand. Say your chainsaw manufacturer recommends a 50:1 fuel/oil mix. This simply means you need 50 parts of gas to one part two-stroke oil. Two-stroke engines derive lubrication from the oil mixed directly into the gasoline, unlike your car engine, which lubricates itself with oil housed in an oil sump and circulated by an oil pump.

Complicating things, some equipment manufacturers recommend different mix ratios. While most modern trimmers, chainsaws, leaf blowers and the like call for 50:1, some older equipment recommends 32:1. If you have multiple pieces of equipment with different mix ratios, you have to mix and store multiple cans of fuel. That’s not only a hassle, it’s a situation begging for problems when you accidentally dump 50:1 in your saw that takes 32:1.

This scenario likely isn’t a problem for landscapers, loggers and other professionals who replace their equipment often due to heavy use. But plenty of homeowners still use older equipment that calls for a richer fuel mixture.

Life would be much easier if every manufacturer recommended the same mix ratio, right?

They don’t. But we do.

AMSOIL SABER Professional Synthetic 2-Stroke Oil is tested and proven at any mix ratio up to 100:1. That means you can mix one can of fuel and use it in all your two-stroke equipment. Done. Problem solved. If you want to use 50:1, use that. Or 80:1. For best value, use 100:1. You could mix at 71:1 if you want. It’s up to you.

And, to eliminate the hassles of mixing fuel, we offer bottle sizes matched to certain sizes of gas cans. For example, to mix AMSOIL SABER Professional at 50:1 in a 2.5-gallon gas can, just use an entire 6.4-oz. bottle. Use half the bottle for a 100:1 mix ratio.

That’s the ratio I now use in my chainsaw. As the piston images show, SABER Professional mixed at 100:1 outperforms other two-stroke oils at 50:1, fighting power-robbing deposits and maintaining operability.

AMSOIL SABER Professional mixed at 100:1 delivers better protection against power-robbing deposits than other oils mixed at 50:1.

With SABER Professional you spend less on oil, get better protection and eliminate hassle when mixing fuel. And you never have to make swamp mix again.